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Santa Monica Boulevard

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Title: Santa Monica Boulevard  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: West Hollywood, California, Melrose Avenue, Cahuenga Branch, Temple Street (Los Angeles), Lincoln Boulevard (Southern California)
Collection: Streets in Los Angeles County, California
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Santa Monica Boulevard

Santa Monica Boulevard at Century City

Santa Monica Boulevard is a major west-east thoroughfare in Los Angeles County. It breaks off of Sunset Boulevard at Sunset Junction and ends at Ocean Avenue in Santa Monica near the Pacific Ocean, and passes through West Hollywood and Beverly Hills.

Route description

The western terminus of Santa Monica Boulevard is at Ocean Avenue near the Pacific Ocean. From there until the San Diego Freeway (Interstate 405), Santa Monica Boulevard is a densely urban commercial street. It assumes the designation California State Route 2 between Lincoln Boulevard and the Hollywood Freeway (U.S. Route 101). From Centinela Avenue, Santa Monica Boulevard heads northeast through the wealthy areas of West Los Angeles, Westwood, Century City, and Beverly Hills before entering the decidedly urban West Hollywood. Santa Monica Boulevard, being a major street, is for most of its length at least four lanes wide.[1] Most of the Westside car dealerships are located on Santa Monica Boulevard. After Sepulveda Boulevard, Santa Monica Boulevard passes by Century City and its shopping center, and intersects with Wilshire Boulevard in Beverly Hills. After intersecting with Wilshire in Beverly Hills, Santa Monica Boulevard continues northeast towards West Hollywood, spanning Beverly Boulevard and Melrose Avenue. At Holloway Drive, in the middle of West Hollywood, Santa Monica, now north of Melrose Avenue turns to run east. In West Hollywood, between Doheny Drive and Fairfax Avenue along Santa Monica Boulevard, bronze name plaques are embedded in the sidewalks as part of the West Hollywood Memorial Walk. One of the most famous spots for male prostitution and transgender prostitution is Santa Monica Boulevard in the Hollywood area, the area along Santa Monica Boulevard east of La Brea Avenue. The original southern end of California State Route 170 was at the intersection with Highland Avenue. Santa Monica Boulevard merges on its eastern end with Sunset Boulevard in the Sunset Junction neighborhood of Silver Lake.

The south roadway of Santa Monica Boulevard, often called Little Santa Monica Boulevard in Beverly Hills, runs parallel to the state highway (north) roadway of Santa Monica Boulevard from the city's west limit to Rexford Drive. After Rexford Drive, Little Santa Monica turns east, becoming Burton Way. Burton Way merges into San Vicente Boulevard at its intersection with La Cienega Boulevard. It is noted that the south roadway of Santa Monica Boulevard in Beverly Hills is a city street while the north roadway of Santa Monica Boulevard is a California state highway, each roadway handling bi-directional traffic.

Transportation

Metro Local line 4, Metro Rapid line 704 and Santa Monica Transit line 1 operate on Santa Monica Boulevard. The Metro Red Line serves an underground station on Santa Monica Boulevard at its intersection with Vermont Avenue.

References

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