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Seon of Balhae

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Seon of Balhae

Seon of Balhae
Hangul 선왕
Hanja 宣王
Revised Romanization Seon wang
McCune–Reischauer Sŏn wang
Birth name
Hangul 대인수
Hanja 大仁秀
Revised Romanization Dae In-su
McCune–Reischauer Tae In-su
Monarchs of Korea
Balhae
  1. Go 698-719
  2. Mu 719–737
  3. Mun 737–793
  4. Dae Won-ui 793
  5. Seong 793-794
  6. Gang 794–809
  7. Jeong 809-812
  8. Hui 812–817
  9. Gan 817–818
  10. Seon 818–830
  11. Dae Ijin 830–857
  12. Dae Geonhwang 857–871
  13. Dae Hyeonseok 871–894
  14. Dae Wihae 894–906
  15. Dae Inseon 906–926

Dae Insu, also known as King Seon (r. 818-830) was the 10th king of the Korean kingdom of Balhae. He restored national strength, and is remembered today as the last of the great Balhae rulers before its fall.

Contents

  • Background 1
  • Reign 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Background

Dae Insu was a 4th-generation descendant of Dae Joyeong's younger brother, Dae Ya-bal. In spite being from the collateral branch, he succeeded to the throne during the years of 817 and 818. He reestablished royal authority, and strengthened the military tremendously.

Reign

The territory of Balhae, In 830s during the reign of king Seon of Balhae.

King Seon concentrated heavily on the empire's territorial expansion, and led campaigns that resulted in the absorption of many northern Malgal tribes including Heishui Mohe. Southwest Little Goguryeo in Liaodong was absorbed into Balhae, and also he ordered southward expansion towards Silla.

During his 12-year reign, he dispatched embassies five times to Japan, which was aimed at establishing diplomatic relations as well as increasing trade between the two kingdoms. Balhae emissaries were treated favorably even though Japan wanted Balhae to restrict the size of the embassies due to the costs associated with hosting them. The trade routes established across the Sea of Japan (East Sea) led to Balhae becoming one of Japan's most important trading partners.

He died in 830 and his grandson Dae Ijin succeeded to the throne.

See also

References

External links

  • The extension of Balhae empire under King Mun and King Seon (Korean)
  • The 5 capitals and the 16 prefectures of Balhae under King Seon reign in 820 (Korean)
Seon of Balhae
Died: 830
Regnal titles
Preceded by
Gan
King of Balhae
818–830
Succeeded by
Dae Ijin
Titles in pretence
Preceded by
Gan
— TITULAR —
King of Korea
Goguryeo claimant
818–830
Reason for succession failure:
North–South States Period
Succeeded by
Dae Ijin
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