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Small heterodimer partner

 

Small heterodimer partner

The small heterodimer partner (SHP) also known as NR0B2 (nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 2) is a protein that in humans is encoded by the NR0B2 gene.[1] SHP is a member of the nuclear receptor family of intracellular transcription factors.[2] SHP is unusual for a nuclear receptor in that it lacks a DNA binding domain. Therefore technically it is neither a transcription factor nor nuclear receptor but nevertheless it is still classified as such due to relatively high sequence homology with other nuclear receptor family members.

Contents

  • Function 1
  • Interactions 2
  • References 3
  • Further reading 4
  • External links 5

Function

The principal role of SHP appears to be repression of other nuclear receptors through association to produce a non-productive heterodimer.[3] The protein has been shown to interact with retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors, inhibiting their ligand-dependent transcriptional activation. In addition, interaction with estrogen receptors has been demonstrated, leading to inhibition of function. Studies suggest that the protein represses nuclear hormone receptor-mediated transactivation via two separate steps: competition with coactivators and the direct effects of its transcriptional repressor function.[1]

Interactions

Small heterodimer partner has been shown to interact with:

References

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Further reading

External links


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