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Soho Repertory Theatre

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Soho Repertory Theatre

Soho Repertory Theatre
The entrance to Soho Rep's space
Address 46 Walker Street
New York City
United States
Coordinates
Type Off-Broadway[1]
Capacity 73
Website
.orgsohorep

The Soho Repertory Theatre, known as Soho Rep,[2] is an Off-Broadway theater company with a 73-seat space located at 46 Walker Street in the TriBeCa district of Manhattan, New York City. This non-profit theater company was founded in 1975 by Jerry Engelbach and Marlene Swartz in an old hat warehouse on Mercer Street, in SoHo. With a founding mission to produce rarely seen classical works,[3] the theater company has grown from an Off-Off Broadway house in Soho, through multiple locations, to its current location on Walker Street where they now produce mainly new works on an Off Broadway contract.[4] They are an award-winning theater company with multiple prizes, including Obie Awards, Drama Desk Awards, Drama Critics' Circle Awards, and awards from The New York Times.

Contents

  • Founding and history 1
    • Founders 1.1
    • Current Artistic Director 1.2
  • Staff - past and present 2
    • Past artistic staff 2.1
    • Current staff 2.2
  • Performance spaces 3
    • 19 Mercer Street 3.1
    • Bellevue Hospital 3.2
    • Greenwich House 3.3
    • Walker Space 3.4
  • Past seasons 4
    • 1975–1976, Season 1 4.1
    • 1976–1977, Season 2 4.2
    • 1977–1978, Season 3 4.3
    • 1978–1979, Season 4 4.4
    • 1979–1980, Season 5 4.5
    • 1980–1981 Season 6 4.6
    • 1981–1982, Season 7 4.7
    • 1982–1983, Season 8 4.8
    • 1983–1984, Season 9 4.9
    • 1984–1985, Season 10 4.10
    • 1985–1986, Season 11 4.11
    • 1986–1987, Season 12 4.12
    • 1987–1988, Season 13 4.13
    • 1988–1989, Season 14 4.14
    • 1989–1990, Season 15 4.15
    • 1990–1991, Season 16 4.16
    • 1991–1992, Season 17 4.17
    • 1992–1993, Season 18 4.18
    • 1993–1994, Season 19 4.19
    • 1994–1995, Season 20 4.20
    • 1995–1996, Season 21 4.21
    • 1996–1997, Season 22 4.22
    • 1997–1998, Season 23 4.23
    • 1998–1999, Season 24 4.24
    • 1999–2000, Season 25 4.25
    • 2000–2001, Season 26 4.26
    • 2001–2002, Season 27 4.27
    • 2002–2003, Season 28 4.28
    • 2003–2004, Season 29 4.29
    • 2004–2005, Season 30 4.30
    • 2005–2006, Season 31 4.31
    • 2006–2007, Season 32 4.32
    • 2007–2008, Season 33 4.33
    • 2008–2009, Season 34 4.34
    • 2009–2010, Season 35 4.35
    • 2010–2011, Season 36 4.36
    • 2011–2012, Season 37 4.37
    • 2012–2013, Season 38 4.38
    • 2013–2014, Season 39 4.39
    • 2014–2015, Season 40 4.40
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Founding and history

The Soho Rep logo

The Soho Repertory Theatre (known as Soho Rep.) was founded in July 1975 by Jerry Engelbach and Marlene Swartz.[3] As co-artistic directors they produced over a hundred plays until Engelbach left in 1989 . Swartz then partnered with English director Julian Webber, until she herself left in 1999.[5] The company has since been helmed by Artistic Directors Daniel Aukin (1999 to 2006), followed by Sarah Benson (2006 to present).[5][6] The company has moved locations many times, from Greenwich Street, to Bellevue Hospital, to their current location at 46 Walker Street. Soho Rep. is known for producing new and avante-garde works, though their founding mission was to produce rarely seen classics.[7] In 2007 Soho Rep. transitioned away from an Off Off Broadway contract to an Off Broadway contract.[8]

Soho Rep’s founding mission was to present rare classical plays. After four seasons, in 1979, they were able to claim the largest subscription audience of any Off Off Broadway Theater company operating at the time.[9] After several years, in 1981, after producing works from Shakespeare to Shaw; the theater produced its first new play, Stephen Davis Parks' The Idol Makers.[10] After 1981 Soho Rep. began to produce more and more new plays. Included in their New York premieres were the stage version of Rod Serling’s television play Requiem for a Heavyweight, J. P. Donleavy’s Fairy Tales of New York, and Preston Sturges’ A Cup of Coffee, the stage play on which he based his film Christmas in July. Among the many new works presented were plays by Americans Len Jenkin and Mac Wellman, and Britons Nicholas Wright, David Lan, and Barrie Keeffe. In 1998 Daniel Aukin became Artistic Director and produced new work by artists including Adam Bock, Young Jean Lee, Richard Maxwell, Melissa James Gibson, and María Irene Fornés.

In 2005, Soho Rep was among 406 New York City arts and social service institutions to receive part of a $20 million grant from the Carnegie Corporation, which was made possible through a donation by New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg.[11]

In 2006 Sarah Benson became the fourth Artistic Director of the company. She directed the New York premiere of Sarah Kane's Blasted to critical acclaim in fall 2008, and has produced and directed work by other contemporary playwrights including John Jesurun, Young Jean Lee, David Adjmi, Nature Theater of Oklahoma, Annie Baker, debbie tucker green, and Branden Jacobs-Jenkins. In 2012, David Adjimi was awarded a Mellon Foundation playwright residency grant with Soho Rep for three years.[12] His play, Marie Antoinette opened the 2013–2014 season.

Founders

Soho Rep. was founded by Jerry Engelbach and Marlene Swartz in 1975. They were both former members of Classic Stage Company. In June 1975 they began remodeling a textiles factory in the SoHo district of Manhattan, and on September 25, 1975 they opened their doors with a production of Maxwell Anderson's Key Largo. Their first theater was located at 19 Mercer Street, between Grand Street and Canal Street, only two blocks away from the space Soho Rep. occupies now on Walker Street. The new repertory theater was designed to run multiple productions from one night to the next. They expected to produce both rarely seen classic plays, and works by Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Molière, Jean Anouilh, Michel de Ghelderode, Eugene O'Neill and Samuel Beckett.[7] Engelbach and Swartz said that they wanted the space to feel, “light and informal. We want the audience to feel the space itself is comfortable and interesting and to do productions in a way which prove to be the most theatrical and immediate for them.” [13] By 1979 the theater was consistently running two shows in repertory, even allowing audiences to see both plays in succession on Saturday nights.[3]

Current Artistic Director

Sarah Benson is a British theater director based in New York City. She became Artistic Director of Soho Repertory Theater, Inc in 2007.[14] She is the fourth artistic director at Soho Rep.[15]

A graduate of King's College London, she first came to the U.S. on a Fulbright award for theater direction to study at Brooklyn College, where she earned her MFA.[15]

At Soho Rep. she directed the production of Sarah Kane’s Blasted[16] for which she received an OBIE award,[17] Gregory S. Moss' Orange Hat and Grace,[18] David Adjmi's Elective Affinities in a site-specific production,[19] Lucas Hnath’s A Public Reading of an Unproduced Screenplay About the Death of Walt Disney,[20] and An Octoroon by Branden Jacobs-Jenkins which one an Obie for Best New American Play and was transferred to Theatre for a New Audience for an extended run.[21] She has also directed new works by artists including Polly Stenham,[22] and the Brooklyn-based indie-rock band The Lisps.

She has commissioned and produced new works by Nature Theater of Oklahoma,[23] John Jesurun,[24] Young Jean Lee,[25] Annie Baker,[26] debbie tucker green,[27] Cynthia Hopkins,[28] and Daniel Alexander Jones.[29] This work has been honored with 10 OBIE awards.[17]

Staff - past and present

Past artistic staff

  • Marlene Swartz (1975–1997) - Co-Artistic Director[3]
  • Jerry Engelbach (1975–1992) - Co-Artistic Director[3]
  • Julian Webber (1992–1998) - Co-Artistic Director[30]
  • Daniel Aukin (1998–2006) - Artistic Director[31][32]
  • Sarah Benson (2007–Present) - Artistic Director[8][33]

Current staff

  • Artistic Director – Sarah Benson
  • Executive Director – Cynthia Flowers
  • Playwright in Residence – David Adjmi
  • Director of New Work & FEED – Raphael Martin

Performance spaces

From the founding of the theater in 1975 till January 1985, Soho Repretory Theater produced all of their work out of a converted hat warehouse on 19 Mercer Street in the neighborhood of SoHo in New York City. In 1985, due to increased rents, the company was forced to move. They were close to homeless before Bob Moss (Playwrights Horizons), Mayor Koch's Office, and a grant from the Manhattan Borough President stepped in to assist them in finding a temporary home. That new home was a 100-seat neo-classical theater attached to Bellevue Hospital, located in the Kips Bay neighborhood of New York City. Soho Rep. produced for one year in this retrofitted hospital auditorium before being forced out to due government regulations. The next space they found was Greenwich House in Greenwich Village, and was shared with multiple other companies. They stayed in the Village until 1991, when they found their present-day space at 46 Walker Street in the TriBeCa neighborhood of New York City.

19 Mercer Street

Soho Rep.'s first home was a converted textile warehouse in the SoHo district of New York City. The theater was 22’5” x 91’, and was designed to have audiences on three sides of the stage, with two doors on the upstage wall that led back to dressing rooms. Along the backstage wall there was a balcony which was often used as a playing area. The house held 90 audience members. The founders, Engelbach and Swartz, referred to the space as "a practical adaptation of the Shakespearean playhouse laid out in a modest modern space.” The company took over the building in June 1975, and began occupancy in July of the same year.[3]

Bellevue Hospital

In April 1984, after almost ten years of residency in their Mercer Street location, Soho Rep. was given 90 days[34] to clear out of their space. Bob Moss, founder of Playwrights Horizons, along with the Mayor's office and the office of the Manhattan Borough President,[35][36] assisted in finding them a new, temporary, home. The new theater was a 100-seat neo-Classical[37] auditorium located at Bellevue Hospital in the Kips Bay neighborhood of Manhattan on 29th Street and First Avenue. Though it was a part of the hospital, it did have a separate entrance.[38] Despite it technically being separate, playwright Mac Wellman remembers, "I wrote a play called Energumen, produced by Soho Rep in their one season at Bellevue. (Yes, the hospital.) To make a cross backstage, one had to take the main corridor of the psychiatric ward. Once, our actors (costumed as Santas and a Master of Many Perfections) took the elevator from their dressing room and found themselves accompanied by two policemen and a prisoner in chains. Never could figure out that damn play."[39]

Greenwich House

After less than a year at Bellevue Hospital, due to "city bureaucracy"[35] Soho Rep. was forced to leave the hospital auditorium and once again look for a new home. In 1986 they landed at Greenwich House, a century old Settlement House located at 27 Barrow Street in Greenwich Village. There they set up residency alongside other downtown theater companies.[40]

Walker Space

Located at 46 Walker Street, Walkerspace was officially moved into in 1991. Feeling the need to no longer share a space, then Artistic Directors Swartz and Webber, moved the company to their present-day location, only two blocks away from where Swartz and Engelbach originally founded the company. 46 Walker Street is 22′ W x 27’D, with a 73-seat house.

Past seasons

1975–1976, Season 1

19 Mercer Street

1976–1977, Season 2 [47]

Six Play Subscription Costs $12 [47]

1977–1978, Season 3

1978–1979, Season 4

One Act Festival Opened Jan 5th, 1979. Cost: $10 for Festival Pass; $3 per show.[62]

  • AWARD - Villager Downtown Theater Award, for a commitment to the presentation of a program of short plays.[63]

1979–1980, Season 5[70][71]

1980–1981 Season 6

1981–1982, Season 7

  • The Girl Who Ate Chicken Bones, book by Stan Kaplan, music by David Hollister, lyrics by Stan Kaplan and David Hollister. directed by Marlene Swartz[85]
  • One-Act Operas: Presented in association with Golden Fleece Ltd.[86]
  1. The Audience, directed by Scott Clugstone, libretto by Glenn Miller, music by Royce Dembo
  2. Mr. Lion, music and libretto by Linder Chlarson, directed by Lou Rodgers
  3. Miyako, written and directed by Lou Rodgers

1982–1983, Season 8

1983–1984, Season 9

1984–1985, Season 10

Theater moves to Bellevue Hospital in January 1985[101][102]

1985–1986, Season 11

Theater moves to Greenwich House, 27 Barrow Street [106]

  • Two Orphans, by Cormon and D’Ennery (Les deux orphelines), directed by Julian Webber, original score by Marhsall Coid
  • One Fine Day, by Nicholas Wright
  • The Grub Street Opera, by Henry Fielding, original music by Handell and Purcell, with a new musical score by Anthony Bowles[107]

1986–1987, Season 12

1987–1988, Season 13

1988–1989, Season 14

  • I've Got the Tune, Marc Blitzstein, Location: St. Bart’s Playhouse (Park and 50th)[113]
  • The Harpies, Marc Blitzstein, directed by Carol Corwen, Location: St. Bart’s Playhouse[113]
  • The Phantom Lady, by ppPedro Calderón de la Barca]], translated by Edwin Honig, directed by Julian Webber[114]
  • The Cezanne Syndrome, by Normand Canac-Marquis, translated by Louison Denis[51]

1989–1990, Season 15

  • Limbo Tales, by Len Jenkin, directed by Thomas Babe[115]
  • American Bagpipes, by Ian Heeggie, directed by Julian Webber[116]

1990–1991, Season 16

Theater is established at 46 Walker Street

Julian Webber is hired as Co-Artistic Director (with Marlene Swartz.)

1991–1992, Season 17

1992–1993, Season 18

  • AWARD - Obie Grant [17]

1993–1994, Season 19

  • David's Red-Haired Death, by Sherry Kramer[123]
  • Terminal Hip, by Mac Wellman[123]
  • Careless Love, written and directed by Len Jenkin[124]
  • Dracula, by Mac Wellman, directed by Julian Webber, featured Tim Blake Nelson[125]
  • Hollywood Hustle, written and performed by Jeremiah Bosgang, directed by Rob Greenberg[126]
  • Exchange, by Yuri Trifonov, translated and adapted by Michael Frayn, directed by Peter Westerhoff[127]
  • Swoop, by Mac Wellman, directed by Julian Webber[128]
  • Women Behind Bars, by Tom Eyen[51]

1994–1995, Season 20

1995–1996, Season 21

  • Dark Ride, by Len Jenkin, directed by Julian Webber (revival of 1981 production)[132]
  • Wally's Ghost, by Ain Gordon[51]
    • AWARD - OBIE, Playwrighting [17]

1996–1997, Season 22

1997–1998, Season 23

1998–1999, Season 24

  • Cowboys and Indians, by Richard Maxwell & Jim Strahs, directed by Richard Maxwell, featured David Cote[135][136]
  • Quartet, by Heiner Müller[51]
  • The Escapist, by The Flying Machine[51]
  • Alice's Evidence, by Ellen Beckerman[51]

1999–2000, Season 25

  • R&D: Research & Development, new work development series featuring Mac Wellman, Richard Maxwell, and Maria Shron.[137]
  • The Year of the Baby, by Quincy Long, Maury Loeb, composer; based on a play by Stephen Foster, Directed by Daniel Aukin[138]
  • Hypatia, by Mac Wellman, directed by Bob McGrath[139]

2000–2001, Season 26

2001–2002, Season 27

  • AWARD - OBIE Grant[17]
  • [sic], by Melissa James Gibson, directed by Daniel Aukin[144]
    • AWARD - OBIE, Playwrighting[17]
    • AWARD - OBIE, Special Citation, Direction (Daniel Aukin)[17]
    • AWARD - OBIE, Special Citation, Set Design (Louisa Thompson)[17]
  • Attempts On Her Life, by Martin Crimp; directed by Steve Cosson[145]

2002–2003, Season 28

  • Signals of Distress, created and performed by members of the Flying Machine; adapted and directed by Joshua Carlebach from the novel of the same name by Jim Crace[146]
  • Molly’s Dream, by María Irene Fornés, directed by Daniel Aukin[147]
    • AWARD - OBIE, Special Citation[17]

2003–2004, Season 29

  • Suitcase, or Those That Resemble Flies from a Distance, by Melissa James Gibson, directed by Daniel Aukin, presented by SoHo Rep and True Love Productions[148]
  • The Appeal, written and directed by Young Jean Lee[149]

2004–2005, Season 30

  • Everything Will Be Different, by Mark Schultz, directed by Daniel Aukin. Later retitled A Brief History of Helen of Troy[150][151][152]
  • Frankenstein, adapted and directed by Joshua Carlebach, from the novel by Mary Shelley, performed by The Flying Machine[153]

2005–2006, Season 31

  • Not Clown, by Carlos Treviño and Steve Moore, directed by Carlos Treviño[154][155]
  • Peninsula, written and directed by Madelyn Kent[156]

2006–2007, Season 32

  • AWARD - OBIE, Ross Wetzsteon Award[17]
  • Thugs, by Adam Bock, directed by Anne Kauffman[157]
    • AWARD - OBIE, Playwrighting (Adam Bock)[17]

2007–2008, Season 33

Sarah Benson begins tenure as Artistic Director. Soho Rep. begins producing under Off-Broadway Equity Contract.[158]

  • Philoktetes, written and directed by John Jesurun (adapted from Sophoclesoriginal)[159]
  • No Dice, by Nature Theater of Oklahoma (performed in a former indoor playground at 66 White Street)[160]
    • AWARD - OBIES, Special Citation[17]

2008–2009, Season 34

  • Blasted, by Sarah Kane, directed by Sarah Benson[161][162]
    • AWARD - OBIES, Special Citation, Direction (Sarah Benson)[17]
    • AWARD - OBIES, Special Citation, Set Design (Louisa Thompson)[17]
  • Sixty Miles to Silver Lake, by Dan LeFranc, directed by Anne Kauffman, in partnership with P73[163][164]
    • AWARD - New York Times Outstanding Playwright Award[165]
  • Rambo Solo, by Nature Theater of Oklahoma, conceived and directed by Pavol Liska and Kelly Copper, in conversation with Zachary Oberzan; performed by Mr. Oberzan[166]

2009–2010, Season 35

2010–2011, Season 36

  • Orange, Hat & Grace, by Gregory Moss, directed by Sarah Benson[18]
  • Jomama Jones * Radiate, performed by Daniel Alexander Jones, directed by Kym Moore, music direction by Bobby Halvorson[29][169]
  • born bad, by debbie tucker green, directed by Leah C. Gardiner[170]
    • AWARD - OBIES, Special Citation, Playwriting (debbie tucker green)[17]
    • AWARD - OBIES, Special Citation, Directing (Leah C. Gardiner)[17]

2011–2012, Season 37

  • Elective Affinities, by David Adjmi, directed by Sarah Benson, produced by Soho Rep., Piece by Piece Productions and Rising Phoenix Repertory. At a location disclosed 48 hours prior to curtain.[171][172]
  • The Ugly One, by Marius von Mayenburg, directed by Daniel Aukin, co-produced with the Play Company, in association with John Adrian Selzer[173]
  • Uncle Vanya, by Annie Baker, adapted from Anton Chekhov's original, directed by Sam Gold, featured Michael Shannon as Astrov, Reed Birney as Vanya, Maria Dizzia as Yelena, in association with John Adrian Selzer[26]

2012–2013, Season 38[174]

  • We Are Proud to Present a Presentation About the Herero of Namibia, Formerly Known as South West Africa, from the German Sudwestafrika Between the Years 1884–1915 by Jackie Sibblies Drury. directed by Eric Ting, in association with John Adrian Selzer[175]
    • AWARD - OBIES, Direction (Eric Ting)[17]
  • Life and Times, Episodes 1-4, Nature Theater of Oklahoma, conceived and directed by Pavol Liska and Kelly Copper, from a telephone conversation with Kristin Worrall; music by Robert M. Johanson, Julie LaMendola and Daniel Gower, coproduced by the Burgtheater in Vienna, staged at The Public Theater as part of its annual Under the Radar Festival, in association with John Adrian Selzer[176]
    • AWARD - OBIES, Special Citation[17]
  • A Public Reading of an Unproduced Screenplay About the Death of Walt Disney, by Lucas Hnath, directed by Sarah Benson, in association with John Adrian Selzer, featured Larry Pine[177]
    • AWARD - OBIES, Performance (Larry Pine),[17]

2013–2014, Season 39

  • Marie Antoinette, By David Adjmi, directed by Rebecca Taichman, in association with John Adrian Selzer, American Repertory Theater, and Yale Repertory Theater[178]
  • An Octoroon, by Branden Jacobs-Jenkins, directed by Sarah Benson, songs, score and musical direction by César Alvarez, choreography by David Neumann, in association with John Adrian Selzer[179]
    • AWARD - OBIES, Chris Myers (acting)[17]
    • AWARD - OBIES, Best New American Play[17]

2014–2015, Season 40

  • generations, by debbie tucker green, directed by Leah C. Gardiner, presented by Soho Rep. and the Play Company, in association with John Adrian Selzer[180]
  • Winners and Losers, created and performed by Marcus Youssef and James Long, directed by Chris Abraham[181]
  • 10 out of 12, by Anne Washburn, directed by Les Waters, in association with John Adrian Selzer[182]

References

  1. ^ Soho Rep
  2. ^ The official website's "About" page now use "Soho", with a lowercase h, as do most articles from the New York Times
  3. ^ a b c d e f Soho Rep: Converting a ground floor fabric warehouse. Theatre Crafts; Sep 28, 1979; New York Public Library Billy Rose Theatre Division, "Soho Repertory Theatre Ephemera"
  4. ^ Robertson, Campbell (July 26, 2007). "Soho Rep Moves On to Off". http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/26/theater/26arts-SOHOREPMOVES_BRF.html?fta=y&_r=0. New York Times. Retrieved 16 October 2014. 
  5. ^ a b Ehren, Christine (Feb 4, 1999). "SoHo Rep Names Daniel Aukin New Artistic Director; Announces `99 Season". playbill.com. 
  6. ^ Parks, Brian (Sep 26, 2006). "Englishwoman in New York". villagevoice.com. 
  7. ^ a b c Soho Rep: Classics Backstage (Archive 1960–2000); Sep 5th, 1975; 16, 35; Entertainment Industry Magazine Archive pg. 20
  8. ^ a b Robertson, Campbell (Sep 14, 2006). "Arts, Briefly; 'Apple Tree' Is Headed For Studio 54". nytimes.com. Retrieved 3 November 2014. 
  9. ^ Nelson, Don Theater Notes; A Hammerlock on Ali Role; Aug 16, 1979, New York Public Library Billy Rose Theatre Division, "Soho Repertory Theatre Ephemera"
  10. ^ Blau, Eleanor. "Weekender Guide; Friday; MISS SHANGE AT THE KITCHEN" (Web.). nytimes.com. Retrieved 2 November 2014. "The SoHo Repertory Theater at 19 Mercer Street doesn't normally stage new plays; it is known for producing rarely performed works by famous writers. However, starting tonight at 8, it will break with tradition to present the New York premiere of The Idol Makers by Stephen Davis Parks."
  11. ^ Roberts, Sa m. "City Groups Get Bloomberg Gift of $20 Million". 
  12. ^ "Mellon Grant". www.mellon.org. Retrieved 10 November 2014. 
  13. ^ Two New Soho Theaters Soho News; Sep 18, 1975; New York Public Library Billy Rose Theatre Division, "Soho Repertory Theatre Ephemera"
  14. ^ Als, Hilton (October 13, 2014). "True Grit, the unsentimental vision of Soho Rep's director". The New Yorker. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  15. ^ a b Parks, Brian (Sep 26, 2006). "English Woman in New York". The Village Voice. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  16. ^ Healy, Patrick (Nov 5, 2008). "Audiences Gasp at Violence; Actors Must Survive It". The New York Times. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  17. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u "Search the Obies". villagevoice.com. Retrieved 14 November 2014. 
  18. ^ a b McElroy, Steven (Sep 12, 2010). "Broadway Bound and Also Unbound". The New York Times. Retrieved 13 November 2014. 
  19. ^ Brantley, Ben (Dec 18, 2011). "Privilege and Poison on the Upper East Side". The New York Times. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  20. ^ Isherwood, Charles (May 10, 2013). "A Dream Is a Wish Your Id Makes". The New York Times. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  21. ^ Brantley, Ben (Feb 26, 2015). "Review: ‘An Octoroon,’ a Branden Jacobs-Jenkins Comedy About Race". The New York Times. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  22. ^ Brantley, Ben (May 18, 2010). "Do You Have a Mother? Then You Have Someone to Blame". The New York Times. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  23. ^ La Rocco, Claudia (Dec 12, 2007). "Dinner Theater Served With Odd Conversations". The New York Times. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  24. ^ James, Caryn (Oct 23, 2007). "Chill, Warrior Outcast, the Gods Are With You". The New York Times. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  25. ^ Isherwood, Charles (Jan 14, 2010). "Blow, Winds! Deconstruct Thy Text!". The New York Times. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  26. ^ a b Isherwood, Charles (Jun 17, 2012). "A Fresh Breeze in Pastoral Russia". The New York Times. Retrieved 13 November 2014. 
  27. ^ Isherwood, Charles (Apr 8, 2011). "Unspeakable Truth, Unspoken". New York Times. Retrieved 12 June 2015. 
  28. ^ Brantley, Ben (May 13, 2010). "Excavating What Dad Left Behind". New York Times. Retrieved 12 June 2015. 
  29. ^ a b Soloski, Alexis (Dec 22, 2010). "RADIOACTIVE STAGE". The Village Voice. Retrieved 13 November 2014. 
  30. ^ Gussow, Mel (Apr 15, 1992). "Theater in Review". New York Times. Retrieved November 3, 2014. 
  31. ^ Copage, Eric (October 31, 1999). "New Yorkers & Co.; New Role for Small Theater Troupes: Entrepreneur". New York Times. Retrieved November 3, 2014. 
  32. ^ Simon, Lizzie (May 1, 2012). "Reliving 35 Years at Soho Rep". Wall Street Journal. Retrieved November 3, 2014. 
  33. ^ Parks, Brian (September 26, 2006). "Englishwoman in New York". Village Voice. Retrieved November 3, 2014. 
  34. ^ Sommers, Michael Soho Rep has 90 Days to Seek New Space Backstage; Apr 13, 1984; New York Public Library Billy Rose Theatre Division, "Soho Repertory Theatre Ephemera"
  35. ^ a b c Soho Rep on the Move... Again Backstage; Jun 28, 1985; New York Public Library Billy Rose Theatre Division, "Soho Repertory Theatre Ephemera"
  36. ^ Soho Rep Finds New Home Backstage; October 26, 1984; New York Public Library Billy Rose Theatre Division, "Soho Repertory Theatre Ephemera"
  37. ^ Soho Rep Finds New Home Backstage; October 26, 1984; New York Public Library Billy Rose Theatre Division, "Soho Repertory Theatre Ephemera"
  38. ^ Mitgang, Herbert (February 15, 1985). "'"Theater: 'The Crimes of Vautrin. New York Times. Retrieved November 3, 2014. 
  39. ^ Soloski, Alexis (May 20, 2009). "Obies 2009: What's Your Worst Theater Experience?". Village Voice. Retrieved November 3, 2014. 
  40. ^ Graves, Michael Soho Rep Finds New Home in Village; Opens Season with "Two Orphans" Backstage; February 14, 1986; New York Public Library Billy Rose Theatre Division, "Soho Repertory Theatre Ephemera"
  41. ^ Two New Soho Theaters Soho News; Sep 18, 1975; New York Public Library Billy Rose Theatre Division, "Soho Repertory Theatre Ephemera"
  42. ^ a b c Gilbert, Ruth (Mar 22, 1976). "In and Around Town". New York Magazine. Retrieved 17 November 2014. 
  43. ^ Gilbert, Ruth (Apr 19, 1976). "In and Around Town". New York Magazine. Retrieved 17 November 2014. 
  44. ^ Gilbert, Ruth (May 3, 1976). "In and Around Town". New York Magazine. Retrieved 17 November 2014. 
  45. ^ Gilbert, Ruth (May 10, 1976). "In and Around Town". New York Magazine. Retrieved 17 November 2014. 
  46. ^ a b Gilbert, Ruth (Jun 21, 1976). "In and Around Town". New York Magazine. Retrieved 17 November 2014. 
  47. ^ a b c Woman Takes the Lead in a Modern 'Merchant'. The New York Times 13 Jan, 1977. http://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1977/01/13/75654586.html?pageNumber=59 | accessdate=September 28, 2014.
  48. ^ http://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1976/08/01/96993772.html?pageNumber=55 accessdate= October 6, 2014
  49. ^ a b c d "Dracula Thrills". nytimes.com. November 5, 1976. p. 46. Retrieved November 2, 2014. 
  50. ^ a b Gilbert, Ruth (Jun 27, 1977). Rain"+"Soho+Rep"&hl=en&sa=X&ei=2GRtVLLOC7XOsQSYqoJo&ved=0CB0Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&q="Rain" "Soho Rep"&f=false "In and Around Town" . New York Magazine. Retrieved 20 November 2014. 
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