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Testicle (food)

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Testicle (food)

Goat testicles at a market in Spain
Beef testicles at a market in Italy
Rooster testicle stew (kakashere pörkölt) in Hungary
Bulls testicle stew (right) in Austria

The testicles of calves, lambs, roosters, and other animals are eaten in many parts of the world, under a wide variety of euphemistic culinary names. Testicles are a by-product of the castration of young male animals raised for meat, so they were probably a late-spring seasonal specialty,[1] though nowadays they are generally frozen and available year-round.

Contents

  • Cookery 1
  • Names 2
  • World variants 3
    • Greece and Cyprus 3.1
    • United States 3.2
  • See also 4
  • External links 5
  • Notes 6

Cookery

Testicles are cooked in a variety of ways: sautéed and sauced, fricasseed, deep-fried with breading or batter, in pies, poached, roasted, and so on. Before cooking, they are generally scalded, skinned, and soaked in cold water.[2]

Names

Testicles are known by a wide variety of euphemisms, including 'stones', 'mountain

  1. ^ a b Laura Mason, in Oxford Companion to Food, s.v. 'Testicles'
  2. ^ Prosper Montagné, Larousse Gastronomique, 1938
  3. ^ Oxford English Dictionary s.v. 'stone' 11a, 'mountain' and 'prairie oyster' 2
  4. ^ Oxford English Dictionary, s.v. 'fry' n2 2b

Notes

Media related to at Wikimedia Commons

External links

See also

In the United States, bull testicles are usually served breaded and deep-fried as an appetizer, under the name "Rocky Mountain oysters".

United States

In Greece and Cyprus, lamb testicles (Greek αμελέτητα) are often grilled on coals .

Greece and Cyprus

World variants

, or 'bull's eggs.' huevos de toro" is occasionally encountered. In Spanish speaking countries in Central and South America they are known as animelles The French term "[4]

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