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The Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee Report on Food Additives

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The Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee Report on Food Additives

The Joint FAO-WHO Expert Committee Report on Food Additives was an international report of the food additives and contaminants and to establish acceptable daily intakes for these substances.

The report

The report has two parts. The first part provides a general discussion of principles governing the toxicological evaluation of food additives and contaminants, the establishments and revision of specifications, and intake assessments of food additives. The second part provides succinct summaries of the toxicological data examined and factors considered when evaluating selected substances and allocating an acceptable daily intake.

Eighteenth report

The eighteenth report was released as World Health Organization Technical Report Series No. 557 in 1974.

Twenty-fifth report

The twenty-fifth report was released as World Health Organization Technical Report Series No. 669 in 1981.

Forty-ninth report

The forty-ninth report was released as World Health Organization Technical Report Series No. 884 in 1999. Evaluations are presented in this report for one antioxidant (tert-butylhydroquinone), two emulsifiers (microcrystalline cellulose and sucrose esters of fatty acids and sucroglycerides), two enzyme preparations (alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase and maltogenic amylase), one flavoring agent (trans-anethole), one glazing agent (hydrogenated poly-1-decene), one sweetening agent (maltitol syrup), and the reduced calorie replacement for conventional fats and oils, salatrim.

Fifty-third report

The fifty third report was released as World Health Organization Technical Report Series No. 896 in 2000.

Fifty-seventh report

The fifty-seventh report was released as World Health Organization Technical Report Series No. 909 in 2002.

Sixty-first report

The sixty-first report was released as World Health Organization Technical Report Series No. 922 in 2004.

Sixty-third report

The sixty-third report was released as World Health Organization Technical Report Series No. 928 in 2005.[1] The first part deals with food additives such as benzyol peroxide, cyclodextrin, hexose oxidase, lutein, hydroxy ethylidine-1, 1-diphosphonic acid, steviol glycosides, D-tagatose, xylanses from Bacillus subtilis, and zeaxanthin. The second part is dedicated to revision of specifications on aluminium powder, iron oxides and titanium oxides; aluminium lakes of coloring matters, hydroxypropyl cellulose, magnesium sulphate, polyvinyl alcohol and metal levels and arsenic specifications. The third part deals with eight groups of flavoring agents such as pyridine, pyrrole and quinoline derivatives; aliphatic and alicyclic hydrocarbons; aliphatic, linear, unsaturated aldehydes, acids and related alcohols, acetals and related esters; monocyclic and bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; amino acid and related substances; tetrahydrofuran and furanone derivatives and Phenyl substituted aliphatic alcohols and related aldehydes and esters. The fourth part deals with safety aspects related to glycyrrhizinic acid, and its monoammonium salt as a natural constituent of liquorice and its use as a flavoring substance in various food products.

References

  1. ^ Book Reviews on Evaluation of certain food additives.

External links

  • The Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives, WHO Technical Report Series 922.
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