World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

The Prizefighter and the Lady

Article Id: WHEBN0002118495
Reproduction Date:

Title: The Prizefighter and the Lady  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Howard Hawks, Muriel Evans, Vince Barnett, David Townsend (art director), Academy Award for Best Story
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

The Prizefighter and the Lady

The Prizefighter and the Lady
Directed by W. S. Van Dyke
Howard Hawks (uncredited)
Produced by W. S. Van Dyke
Hunt Stromberg
Written by Frances Marion (story)
John Lee Mahin
John Meehan
Starring Myrna Loy
Max Baer
Primo Carnera
Jack Dempsey
Cinematography Lester White
Edited by Robert Kern
Distributed by MGM
Release dates
  • November 10, 1933 (1933-11-10)
Running time 102 minutes
Country United States
Language English

The Prizefighter and the Lady is a 1933 black-and-white Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer romance film starring Myrna Loy and famous professional boxers Max Baer, Primo Carnera, and Jack Dempsey.

Production background

This movie was the film debut for Baer and Carnera. Carnera was the world heavyweight boxing champion at the time of the film's release, while Baer took the title away from him the following year.

Howard Hawks was the initial director, but left the set when he found he would be working with non-actor Baer, not Clark Gable. MGM replaced Hawks with W. S. Van Dyke.[1]

The film was adapted for the screen by John Lee Mahin and John Meehan from a story by Frances Marion. Marion was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Writing, Original Story.

Plot

While working as a barroom Walter Huston) with his skills. The Professor talks Steve into entering a prize fight with an up-and-coming boxer to make money for both of them.

While out training on the road, Steve is nearly run over by a speeding car that crashes into a ditch. He carries nightclub singer Belle Mercer (Myrna Loy) out of the wreckage. Though she is attracted to him, she refuses to have anything to do with Steve. He learns where she lives and goes to see her anyway. He is too cocky to be concerned when she reveals that she is the girlfriend of well-known gangster Willie Ryan (Otto Kruger). When Willie finds out, Belle reassures him she is in control of her emotions. Willie is not so certain about that, but is too shrewd to have Steve killed out of hand by his bodyguard, whom he jokingly calls his "Adopted Son" (Robert McWade). It turns out that he had cause for concern; Steve persuades Belle to marry him. Deeply in love with Belle himself and still hoping to get her back, Willie lets Steve live.

Steve quickly rises through the boxing ranks. However, he cannot keep from fooling around with other women. When Belle catches him in a lie, she tells him that she loves him, but if he cheats on her once more, she will leave him. While waiting for a bout for the heavyweight championship of the world, Steve performs in a musical revue. When Belle unexpectedly goes to his dressing room, she finds a woman hiding there. It is the end of their marriage. She gets her old job back with Willie.

Anxious to see the overconfident Steve humiliated, Willie finds out what is holding up the match with the current champion, Primo Carnera (playing himself), and pays $25,000 to set it up. When the Professor tries to get Steve to train properly (without women and liquor), Steve gets angry and slaps him, ending their partnership.

The championship bout is refereed by boxing promoter and former champion Jack Dempsey (himself). Belle, Willie and the Professor are all in attendance. For most of the ten-round fight, Steve gets pummeled by the much heavier Carnera. Finally, a distraught Belle urges the Professor to forget his wounded pride and go to Steve's corner to provide much needed advice. With his old friend and his ex-wife rooting him on, a heartened Steve makes a furious comeback in the final rounds. The match ends in a draw; Carnera retains his title.

Later, Willie enters Belle's nightclub dressing room and tells her she is fired. Then he brings Steve in and leaves the couple alone to reconcile.

Cast

The Three Stooges are reported to have been in a deleted scene.

Crew

DVD release

This film was released on DVD on June 27, 2011 by the Warner Archive Collection.

In real life

On March 16, 1934, The Prizefighter and the Lady premiered at the Capitol Theater in Berlin. However, when permission was sought to show a German-dubbed version, Nazi Minister of Propaganda Joseph Goebbels had the film banned in Germany because, as one of his underlings stated, "the chief character is a Jewish boxer"[2] (Baer's grandfather was Jewish). Baer contended, however, that "They didn't ban the picture because I have Jewish blood. They banned it because I knocked out Max Schmeling"[2][3] on June 8, 1933.

Baer defeated Carnera during their real-life June 14, 1934 fight after knocking him down a record 11 times. He was supposedly able to do this after watching Carnera's fighting style during the movie's filming.

References

  1. ^ Leider, Emily W. (2011). Myrna Loy: The Only Good Girl in Hollywood. University of California Press. p. 105.  
  2. ^ a b  
  3. ^ Hal Daniels (July 4, 2005). "Cinderella Sucker-punched Max Baer".  

External links

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.