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The Viking Queen

The Viking Queen
UK quad poster by Tom Chantrell
Directed by Don Chaffey
Produced by John Temple-Smith
Screenplay by Clarke Reynolds
John Temple-Smith (story)
Starring Don Murray
Music by Gary Hughes
Cinematography Stephen Dade
Edited by Peter Boita
Production
company
Distributed by Warner-Pathé Distributors (UK)
Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation (U.S.)
Release dates
25 March 1967
Running time
91 minutes
Country UK
Language English
Budget ₤411,000[1]

The Viking Queen is a 1967 Hammer adventure film set in Roman Britain.

Contents

  • Plot Summary 1
  • Cast 2
  • Production 3
  • Reception 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Plot Summary

According to her father's wishes, Queen Salinas agrees to share the rule of Icena with Justinian, a Roman. This decision angers both the bloodthirsty Druids and Romans less just than Justinian. As the two rulers fall in love, the Druids and the Romans begin to plot their downfall. It's not long before the hills of Britain are stained with the lovers blood.[2]

The title of the film caused much confusion, because there are no Norse Vikings in the movie. However, another meaning of the word "viking" is that of a raider or plunderer, of which there are many such characters in this film.

The plot combines elements of life of the historic queen Boudica (featuring the Iceni tribe, combat chariots) with elements seemingly drawn from Vincenzo Bellini's opera Norma, though that is set in Gaul.

Cast

Production

The film was budgeted at ₤350,000 and went over budget by ₤61,000.[1]

During filming in Ireland, Patrick Troughton, who was playing the part of Tristram, was offered the role of the Second Doctor in Doctor Who. Eventually, he accepted.

Reception

The Viking Queen was given mixed reviews on its original release while it performed poorly at the box office.[3] The film itself currently holds a two and a half star rating (4.9/10) on IMDB

The Radio Times noted, "a story that would struggle to get a pass grade in GCSE English.";[4] while TV Guide wrote, "an interesting, well-photographed attempt to depict the land of the blue-painted troglodytes...The costumes reveal more flesh than might have been wise in the cold, damp climate of the Irish mountains where location scenes were shot." [5]

References

  1. ^ a b Marcus Hearn & Alan Barnes, The Hammer Story: The Authorised History of Hammer Films, Titan Books, 2007 p 79
  2. ^ Adapted from "The Viking Queen (1967)" by Jeremy Perkins. IMBd. Accessed 25 July 2012.
  3. ^ Marcus Hearn, The Hammer Vault, Titan Books, 2011 p93
  4. ^ David Parkinson. "The Viking Queen". RadioTimes. 
  5. ^ "The Viking Queen". TV Guide. 

External links


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