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Three-point stance

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Title: Three-point stance  
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Subject: Defensive end, Stance (American football), Tight end, Trap run, Drop-back pass
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Three-point stance

Alabama offensive lineman Chance Warmack in a three-point stance.

The three-point stance is a stance used by linemen and running backs in American football when ready for the start of a play. Pop Warner first had his players use it.[1] This stance requires one hand to touch the ground with the other arm cocked back to the thigh/hip region. The back should be slightly inclined forward, as well as the arm which is placed on the ground. It is a position

Offensive linemen should put almost no pressure on the grounded hand because an opponent could easily knock him down by attacking it. A defensive lineman however wants an explosive start when the ball is snapped and may lean heavily on the grounded arm to facilitate this. The head should be raised toward the opponent when in this position. This prevents the player from sustaining serious injury and helps him to guide his initial action when the play begins (for example, an offensive lineman might choose whom to block first).

The three-point stance can be useful when trying to gain 'leverage' on the opponent. Reggie White expressed his preference in using this kind of stance.

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell has discussed banning the stance from the game due to injury concerns.

References

  1. ^ https://books.google.com/books?id=sT8uCriUVloC&pg=PA74&lpg=PA74#v=onepage&q&f=false


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