World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Thujopsis

Article Id: WHEBN0000556799
Reproduction Date:

Title: Thujopsis  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Thuja, Cupressaceae, List of garden plants, Hiba, Sado, Niigata
Collection: Cupressaceae, Endemic Flora of Japan, Least Concern Plants, Monotypic Conifer Genera, Trees of Japan
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Thujopsis

Thujopsis
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Pinophyta
Class: Pinopsida
Order: Pinales
Family: Cupressaceae
Genus: Thujopsis
Species: T. dolabrata
Binomial name
Thujopsis dolabrata
(Thunb. ex L. f.) Siebold & Zucc.

Thujopsis (pronounced "Thuyopsis") is a conifer in the cypress family (Cupressaceae), the sole member of the genus being Thujopsis dolabrata. It is endemic to Japan, where it is named asunaro (あすなろ). It is similar to the closely related genus Thuja (Arborvitae), differing in the broader, thicker leaves and thick cones. It is also called hiba,[1] false aborvitae, or hiba arborvitae.

A popular allegory for the meaning behind asunaro is asu wa hinoki ni narou (明日はヒノキになろう, lit. tomorrow it will become a hinoki cypress, i.e. the tree looks like a smaller version of the common hinoki cypress). In Japan, other than being called asunaro, it also goes by the name hiba (ひば). There are also a few regional variations, with asunaro being called ate (貴, 阿天) in Ishikawa, and atebi on Sado island.

Thujopsis is a medium to large evergreen tree, reaching up to 40 m tall and 1.5 m trunk diameter, with red-brown bark which peels in vertical strips. The leaves are arranged in decussate pairs, scale-like, 3–10 mm long, glossy green above, and marked with vivid white stomatal bands below; they have a distinctive thick, almost fleshy texture. The seed cones are ovoid, 7–15 mm long and 6–10 mm diameter, with 6-12 thick scales, brown with a violet-white wax bloom when fresh.

There are two varieties:

  • Thujopsis dolabrata var. dolabrata. Central and southern Japan. Shoots less densely branched with slightly larger leaves, and strongly thickened cone scales.
  • Thujopsis dolabrata var. hondai. Northern Japan. Shoots more densely branched with slightly smaller leaves, and less thickened cone scales.

Uses

The asunaro is a valued ornamental tree both in its native Japan, where it is commonly planted around temples as well as in gardens, and also in Europe and North America. In the latter two regions, planting is confined to areas with good rainfall or in gardens with reliable irrigation, as the species is not drought tolerant. It has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.[2]

It is also used to a small extent in forestry in Japan, grown for the valuable wood, which is durable and scented, similar to that of Thuja plicata.

References

  1. ^ "BSBI List 2007". Botanical Society of Britain and Ireland. Archived from the original (xls) on 2015-02-25. Retrieved 2014-10-17. 
  2. ^ "Thujopsis dolabrata AGM". Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 14 July 2012. 
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.