World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Tit-Bits

Article Id: WHEBN0008089800
Reproduction Date:

Title: Tit-Bits  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Arnold Bennett, Arthur Lowe, Carsten Borchgrevink, Harrison Marks, R. K. Laxman, George Newnes, Bonzo the dog, Sir Arthur Pearson, 1st Baronet, Review of Reviews, Henry Pottinger Stephens
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Tit-Bits

Tit-Bits (or to give it its full title Tit-Bits from all the interesting Books, Periodicals, and Newspapers of the World) was a British weekly magazine founded by George Newnes on 22 October 1881 until 18 July 1984,[1] when it was taken over by Associated Newspapers' Weekend, which itself closed in 1989. The last editors were David Hill and Brian Lee.[2] Tit-Bits lost the hyphen from its masthead at the beginning of 1973.

The magazine was a mass circulation commercial publication which reached sales of between 400,000 and 600,000, with the emphasis on human interest stories concentrating on drama and sensation.[3] Short stories and full length fiction was also incorporated, including works by authors such as Rider Haggard and Isaac Asimov, plus three very early stories by Christopher Priest.

The first humorous article by P. G. Wodehouse, 'Men Who Missed Their Own Weddings' appeared in TitBits in November 1900.[4]

In All Things Considered by G. K. Chesterton, the author contrasts Tit-Bits with the Times, saying: "[an author] ask himself whether he would really rather be asked in the next two hours to write the front page of The Times, which is full of long leading articles, or the front page of Tit-Bits, which is full of short jokes." Reference to this magazine is also made in James Joyce's Ulysses,[5] George Orwell's Animal Farm, James Hilton's Lost Horizon, Virginia Woolf's Moments of Being, and H. G. Wells' The First Men in the Moon. H. G. Wells also mentioned it in his book Experiment in Autobiography, chapter VI. The magazine is burlesqued as 'Chit Chat' in George Gissing's 'New Grub Street'.

The magazine name has survived as Titbits International.

References

Endnotes
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.