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Treaty of Leoben

A sketch for a painting drawn in 1806 by Guillaume Guillon-Lethière. Now in the Palace of Versailles.
The garden house formerly owned by Josef von Eggenwald was the site of the signing

The Treaty of Leoben[1] was a general armistice and preliminary peace agreement between the Holy Roman Empire and the First French Republic that ended the War of the First Coalition. It was signed at Eggenwaldsches Gartenhaus, near Leoben, on 18 April 1797 (29 Germinal V in the French revolutionary calendar) by General Maximilian von Merveldt and the Marquis of Gallo on behalf of the Emperor Francis II and by General Napoléon Bonaparte on behalf of the French Directory. Ratifications were exchanged in Montebello on 24 May and the treaty came into effect immediately.

On 30 March, Bonaparte had made his headquarters at Klagenfurt and from there, on 31 March, he sent a letter to the Austrian commander-in-chief, the Archduke Charles, requesting an armistice to prevent the further loss of life. Receiving no response, the French advanced as far as Judenburg by the evening of 7 April. That night Charles proffered a truce for five days, and this was accepted. On 13 April, Merveldt went to the French headquarters at Leoben and requested the armistice be extended so that a preliminary peace could be signed. This was granted and three proposals were drawn up. The final one was accepted by both sides and, on 18 April, at Leoben, the preliminary peace was signed.[1]

The treaty contained nine public articles and eleven secret ones. In the former the Emperor ceded

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