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Tripadi

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Title: Tripadi  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: Kannada literature, Jagannatha Dasa, A. N. Narasimhia, Kannada prosody, Siddheshwar
Collection: Kannada Grammar, Kannada Literature, Literature of Karnataka
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Tripadi

Tripadi (Kannada, Sanskrit lit. tri: three, pad or "adi": feet) is a native metre in the Kannada language dating back to c. 700 CE.

Contents

  • Definition 1
  • Metrical structure 2
  • Example 3
  • See also 4
  • Notes 5
  • References 6

Definition

The tripadi consists of three lines, each differing from the others in the number of feet and moras (Sanskrit matras),[1] but in accordance with the following rules:

  • The first line has 4 feet, each with 5 moras, and a caesura at the end of the second foot.[1]
  • The 6th and 10th feet of the tripadi are each required to have the metrical pattern of a Brahma foot:

-\smile \ \mathrm{or} \ \smile\smile\smile \ \mathrm{or} \ -- \ \mathrm{or} \ \smile\smile- \ \

where \smile (breve) denotes a short syllable, and - (macron) a long one.

  • The remaining feet have either 5 moras or 4, chosen to satisfy the rules of Nagavarma II:[1]

Line 1 20 moras in four feet
Line 2 17 moras in four feet
Line 3 13 moras in three feet.

Metrical structure

An example, of a possible scansion (metrical structure) of a tripadi, is given in (Kittel 1875, p. 98), where it is also stressed that it is not the form of the moras, but the number that is important. (Here * denotes a caesura)

\overbrace{\smile \smile \smile-}^{\mathrm{Foot 1}} | \overbrace{\smile\smile\smile-}^{\mathrm{Foot 2}} \star \overbrace{\smile\smile\smile-}^{\mathrm{Foot 3}} | \overbrace{-\smile-}^{\mathrm{Foot 4}} (Line 1: 20 moras in 4 feet)

\overbrace{\smile \smile \smile\smile}^{\mathrm{Foot 5}} | \overbrace{\underbrace{--}_{\mathrm{Brahma}}}^{\mathrm{Foot VI}} | \overbrace{\smile\smile\smile-}^{\mathrm{Foot 7}} | \overbrace{\smile\smile\smile\smile}^{\mathrm{Foot 8}} (Line 2: 17 moras in 4 feet)

\overbrace{\smile \smile \smile\smile}^{\mathrm{Foot 9}} | \overbrace{\underbrace{--}_{\mathrm{Brahma}}}^{\mathrm{Foot X}} | \overbrace{\smile\smile\smile-}^{\mathrm{Foot 11}} || (Line 3: 13 moras in 3 feet)

Another example (Kittel 1875, p. 99) is:

\overbrace{\smile \smile-\smile}^{\mathrm{Foot 1}} | \overbrace{--\smile}^{\mathrm{Foot 2}} \star \overbrace{\smile\smile-\smile}^{\mathrm{Foot 3}} | \overbrace{-\smile-}^{\mathrm{Foot 4}} (Line 1: 20 moras in 4 feet)

\overbrace{\smile \smile \smile\smile}^{\mathrm{Foot 5}} | \overbrace{\underbrace{-\smile}_{\mathrm{Brahma}}}^{\mathrm{Foot VI}} | \overbrace{\smile\smile-\smile}^{\mathrm{Foot 7}} | \overbrace{-\smile\smile\smile}^{\mathrm{Foot 8}} (Line 2: 17 moras in 4 feet)

\overbrace{\smile \smile -\smile}^{\mathrm{Foot 9}} | \overbrace{\underbrace{-\smile}_{\mathrm{Brahma}}}^{\mathrm{Foot X}} | \overbrace{\smile\smile\smile-}^{\mathrm{Foot 11}} || (Line 3: 13 moras in 3 feet)

Example

A well-known example of the tripadi is the third stanza in the inscription of Kappe Arabhatta (here the symbol | denotes the end of a line, and ||, the end of the tripadi): The literal translation of the tripadi is:[2]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b c Kittel 1875, p. 98, Narasimhia 1941, p. 383
  2. ^ Narasimhia 1941, pp. 346, 329, 323, 295, 286, 320, 278

References

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