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Trishala

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Title: Trishala  
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Subject: Auspicious dreams in Jainism, Mahudi, Rani Padmavati, Maurya Empire
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Trishala


Detail of a leaf with, The Birth of Mahavira (the 24th Jain Tirthankara), from the Kalpa Sutra, c. 1375–1400.

Trishala also known as Queen Trishala, Mother Trishala, Trishala Devi, Priyakarini, or Trishala Mata was the Mother of Mahavira, the 24th Tirthankara of Jainism, and wife of the Jain monarch, Siddartha of Kundgraam, of present-day Bihar.

She finds mention in the classical Jain Agamas, the Kalpa sutra, written by Acharya Bhadrabahu (433 - 357 BC), which is primarily a biography of the Tirthankaras.

Life

Like her son Mahavira, Trishala was born into royalty. She was daughter of Chetaka, republican president of Vaishali City.eldest daughter[›] Trishala had seven sisters, one of whom was initiated into the Jain monastic order while the other six married famous kings, including Bimbisara of Magadha and Mahavira's own brother, Nandivardhana. She and her husband Siddhartha were followers of Parshva, the 23rd Tirthankara. According to Jain texts, Trishala carried her son for nine months and seven and a half days during the 6th century BC. However, Svetambaras generally believe that he was conceived by Devananda, the wife of a Brahmin and was transferred to Trishala's womb by Indra because all Tirthankaras have to be Kshatriyas.

Dreams

Queen Trishala, Mahaviras mother has 14 auspicious dreams. Folio 4 from Kalpa sutra.
According to the Jain scriptures, Trishala had fourteen dreams after the conception of her son.conception[›] In the Digambara sect of the Jaina religion, there were 16 dreams. After having these dreams she woke her husband King Siddhartha and told him about the dreams. The next day Siddhartha summoned the scholars of the court and asked them to explain the meaning of the dreams. According to the scholars, these dreams meant that the child would be born very strong, courageous, and full of virtue.
  1. Dream of an elephant
  2. Dream of a bull
  3. Dream of a lion
  4. Dream of Laxmi
  5. Dream of flowers
  6. Dream of a full moon
  7. Dream of the sun
  8. Dream of a large banner
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