U-velOSity (microkernel)

Green Hills Software Inc.
Private
Founded 1982
Headquarters Santa Barbara, California
Key people Dan O'Dowd, founder and president
Website

Green Hills Software is a privately owned company that builds operating systems and development tools for embedded systems. The company was founded in 1982 by Dan O'Dowd and Carl Rosenberg. Headquarters are in Santa Barbara, California.[1]

Products

Real-time operating systems (RTOS)

Compilers

Green Hills produces compilers for C, C++, Fortran, and Ada. The compilers target 32- and 64-bit platforms, including ARC, ARM, Blackfin, ColdFire, MIPS, PowerPC, SuperH, StarCore, x86, V850, and XScale.[5]

The Green Hills C compilers support C99, MISRA C diagnostics, and K&R C.[6]

Integrated development environment (IDE)

  • MULTI is an IDE for C, C++, EC++, and Ada. Aimed at embedded engineers, it is tightly coupled with Green Hills' compilers and hardware debug probes. It includes an integrated CVS browser, a diff viewer, code completion, graphical class hierarchy generators, run-time error checking, and scriptable breakpoints.[7]
  • TimeMachine[8] is a set of tools for optimizing and debugging C and C++ software. TimeMachine records every instruction executed on a CPU, archives the instructions, and allows the developer to review the executed instructions. The TimeMachine debugger uses the recorded instructions to reconstruct the system's state backwards in time; hence the name of the product. On embedded processors, TimeMachine is implemented using a trace port on the CPU.[9] Trace ports are built directly on the processor die and thus have virtually no performance penalties, allowing TimeMachine to collect debug information at full speed. TimeMachine can be used for analyzing race conditions and other Heisenbugs. The ability to replay instruction sequences at a later time may be used by embedded engineers who cannot use breakpoints because halting the program is impossible (for example, when debugging the flight controller on an aircraft).[10] GDB incorporated a similar "reverse debugging" capability in its 7.0 release.
  • TraceEdge is a trace collector that allows the programmer to use TimeMachine on microprocessors without a built-in trace port.[11]

Processor probes and hardware debug devices

  • The Green Hills Probe is a hardware debug probe for load, control, debug, and test on a target system without the need for prior board initialization. Through a JTAG or BDM test port, the probe can debug and control the core state (such as CPU internal registers) as well as the system state (external RAM and flash memory).[12]
  • The SuperTrace Probe adds a trace collection system that non-intrusively captures up to one gigabyte of trace data in real time at processor speeds up to 1.2 GHz.[13]
  • The Slingshot debug probe has a USB interface.[14]

Notes and references

External links

  • Profile at biz.yahoo.com
  • Article at EDN
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