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UGM-96 Trident I

UGM-96 Trident I (C4)
The first launch of a Trident I with a drag-reducing aerospike, from Cape Canaveral, on 18 January 1977
Type SLBM
Place of origin United States
Service history
Used by United States Navy
Production history
Manufacturer Lockheed Missiles Division
Specifications
Weight 73,066 pounds (33,142 kg)
Length 33 feet (10.2 m)
Diameter 71 inches (1.8 m)
Warhead thermonuclear weapon multiple independently targetable reentry vehicles (MIRV). Eight W76 (100 kt) warheads (Mark 4).

Engine Solid-fuel rocket
Operational
range
4,600 miles (7,400 km)
Guidance
system
Astro-inertial guidance
Accuracy CEP: 1250 ft (380 m)[1]
Launch
platform
Ballistic Missile Submarine

The UGM-96 Trident I, or Trident C4, was an American Submarine-launched ballistic missile, built by Lockheed Martin Space Systems in Sunnyvale, California. First deployed in 1979, the Trident I replaced the Poseidon missile. It was retired in 2005,[2] having been replaced by the Trident II. In 1980, the Royal Navy requested Trident I missiles under the Polaris Sales Agreement, however in 1982, this was changed to Trident IIs. It was the first Trident missile to enter service.

The Trident I is a three-stage, solid-fuelled missile.

The first eight Ohio-class submarines were armed with Trident I missiles. Twelve James Madison- and Benjamin Franklin-class submarines were also retrofitted with Trident I missiles, which replaced older Poseidon missiles.

See also

Media related to at Wikimedia Commons

References

  1. ^ Parsch, Andreas. "UGM-133". Directory of U.S. Military Rockets and Missiles. Retrieved 2009-02-14. 
  2. ^ Popejoy, Mary (November 5, 2005). "USS Alabama Offloads Last of C4 Trident Missiles". navy.mil. US Navy. Retrieved May 16, 2012. 
Diagramatic view of a Trident II D5 missile
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