World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Ubi Dwyer

Article Id: WHEBN0024508827
Reproduction Date:

Title: Ubi Dwyer  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Windsor Free Festival, Ubi, Smiley, UK underground, Bomb Culture
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Ubi Dwyer

Bill 'Ubi' Dwyer or William Ubique Dwyer (21 January 1933 – 13 October 2001) was an anarchist activist in Windsor Free Festival.

Early Activism

In the mid-1950s, Bill Dwyer moved to Aotearoa/NZ from Ireland. Whilst there he was introduced to anarchism by an English ex-pat and became very active in politics. He lived in NZ from the mid-1950s to 1966, and left behind him a series of legendary events. Dwyer did things like pass no confidence motions in the leadership of the Wellington Watersiders Union and the Victoria University Students Union, and was convicted for calling the Queen a bludger whilst speaking in Auckland in 1966.[1]

Dwyer moved to Sydney in 1966, selling cheap LSD in Sydney to finance anarchist activities. He became an exponent of psychedelic anarchism, believing acid to be a liberating substance. He was sent to prison in 1968 for selling LSD, and with the Australian government seeing him as a dangerous criminal, he was deported to Ireland in 1969.[2]

He was said to have been asked by John Lennon to help set up a commune on an island which may have been related to the Island Commune that he ran on Merrion Road in Dublin in 1970. A commune did exist on Dorinish, set up by friend Sid Rawle, between 1970 and 72.

In London he was involved with the [3]

Windsor and Free Festivals

His experiences in the "liberation" of the Caesar's Camp nearby.[6]

Later life

Sometime around '76 he returned to Dublin, continuing for some years to organise a People's Free Festival in Phoenix Park, campaigning for legalisation of Cannabis[7] and H-Blocks prisoner rights.

References

  1. ^ Boraman, Toby (2007) "Rabble rousers and merry pranksters: a history of anarchism in Aotearoa/New Zealand from the mid-1950s to the early 1980s" pp. 8–25
  2. ^ Coombs, Anne (1996) "Sex and Anarchy: the Life and Death of the Sydney Push" (Viking), pp.182–186.
  3. ^ Bill Dwyer's 'Acid Symposium' at the Conway Hall
  4. ^ Beam, Alan (1976) "Rehearsal for the year 2000: (drugs, religions, madness, crime, communes, love, visions, festivals and lunar energy) : the rebirth of Albion Free State (known in the Dark Ages as England) : memoirs of a male midwife (1966–1976)"
  5. ^ Clarke, Michael (1982) "The Politics of Pop Festivals", chapter four 'The Development of Free Festivals, 1973–1976'
  6. ^ Rex v Regina – Ubi's arrest and Caesar's Camp Free Festival – IT 1978
  7. ^ Ubi Dwyer is organising a "Legalise It" campaign in Ireland and 1980 People's Festival in Phoenix Park – IT 1980

Bibliography

  • Boraman, Toby (2007) "Rabble rousers and merry pranksters: a history of anarchism in Aotearoa/New Zealand from the mid-1950s to the early 1980s" pp. 8–25
  • Coombs, Anne (1996) "Sex and Anarchy: the Life and Death of the Sydney Push" (Viking), pp. 182–186.
  • Beam, Alan (1976) "Rehearsal for the year 2000: (drugs, religions, madness, crime, communes, love, visions, festivals and lunar energy) : the rebirth of Albion Free State (known in the Dark Ages as England) : memoirs of a male midwife (1966–1976)"
  • Clarke, Michael (1982) "The Politics of Pop Festivals", chapter four 'The Development of Free Festivals, 1973–1976'
  • McKay, George (1996) Senseless Acts of Beauty: Cultures of Resistance since the Sixties, chapter one 'The free festivals and fairs of Albion'
  • Cloonan, Martin (1996) "Banned!: censorship of popular music in Britain, 1967–92"

External links

  • The forgotten festival – I was there
  • Ubi Dywer @ ukrockfestivals.com
  • The legend of Bill Ubique Dwyer
  • Origins of the Traveller scene – Alan Dearling
  • Memories of a Free Festival – Bill "Ubi" Dwyer, Windsor and Phoenix Park Free Festivals
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.