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Undateable

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Undateable

Undateable
Genre Comedy
Created by Adam Sztykiel
Based on Undateable
by Ellen Rakieten
Anne Coyle
Starring
Country of origin United States
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 3
No. of episodes 28 (list of episodes)
Production
Executive producer(s)
Camera setup Multi-camera
Production company(s)
Distributor Warner Bros. Television Distribution
Release
Original channel NBC
Original release May 29, 2014 (2014-05-29) – present (present)
External links
Official website

Undateable is an American multi-camera comedy television series that premiered on May 29, 2014, as a mid-season replacement on NBC.[1][2] The series was created by Adam Sztykiel and is based on the book Undateable: 311 Things Guys do That Guarantee They Won't be Dating or Having Sex by Ellen Rakieten and Anne Coyle.[3][4][5] On May 8, 2015, NBC renewed Undateable for a third season that will consist entirely of live episodes,[6][7] which premiered on October 9, 2015.[8]

Premise

Danny Burton is a 34-year-old carefree single guy who has watched most of his friends move on to serious relationships. When his last remaining friend Shannon moves out to get married, Danny searches for a new roommate. A promising candidate is Justin, the owner of Black Eyes Bar (frequently mispronounced "Black Guys Bar") in the Detroit suburb of Ferndale. Justin and his friends – the creepy Burski, oddball Shelly, and recently out-of-the-closet Brett – all have certain qualities that make them appear "undateable". While Danny himself has good luck getting women into bed, he is unable or unwilling to form a lasting commitment with any of them. Danny's older sister, Leslie, has similar fears about being undateable, having the "baggage" of being a mid-30s divorcee.

Cast

Main cast

  • Chris D'Elia as Danny Burton
  • Brent Morin as Justin Kearney, Danny's uptight roommate
  • David Fynn as Brett, Justin's recently-out employee and friend
  • Rick Glassman as Adam Burski, Justin's awkward friend who has a crush on Leslie
  • Ron Funches as Shelly, Justin's oddball friend
  • Bianca Kajlich as Leslie Burton, Danny's recently divorced sister, who is now in a relationship.
  • Bridgit Mendler as Candace (Season 2–), Justin's optimistic new bartender who has a crush on him. Starting from Season 3, Justin and Candace are now dating. [9]

Recurring

  • Briga Heelan as Nicki, Justin's former employee who was briefly his girlfriend
  • Eva Amurri Martino as Sabrina, Danny's ex-girlfriend and Justin's new employee (Season 1)
  • Rory Scovel as Kevin, Justin's and Danny's annoying neighbor
  • Adam Hagenbuch as Trent, Candace's ex-boyfriend

Guest

Musical guests

Episodes

Season Episodes Originally aired
First aired Last aired
1 13 May 29, 2014 (2014-05-29) July 3, 2014 (2014-07-03)
2 10 March 17, 2015 (2015-03-17) May 12, 2015 (2015-05-12)
3 13[13][14] October 9, 2015 (2015-10-09) TBA

Production

Development and casting

NBC purchased the script from Bill Lawrence in October 2012.[5][15] Casting for the pilot began in early 2013, with Brent Morin and Rick Glassman being cast in February and Bianca Kajlich and Chris D'Elia being cast in March.[16][17][18][19] Matthew Wilkas was also cast in March as Brett, Justin's gay friend.[20] Aly Michalka was originally cast as Maddie, a waitress in Justin's bar and Justin's love interest, but she left the show in April 2013 and was replaced with Briga Heelan in a guest star role as the similar character Nicki.[21][22]

Filming

In May 2013, NBC placed a series order for Undateable.[23] After the series was ordered, Wilkas left and was replaced with David Fynn in the role of Brett.[24] When both Undateable and Ground Floor, which stars Heelan, were picked up as series, Megan Park was cast to replace Heelan in the Nicki role.[25] However, by September of that year, the producers were able to arrange the schedules of the two shows so that Heelan could appear on Undateable as Nicki on a recurring basis, and she replaced Park.[26]

In March 2014, Lawrence, Morin, Glassman, Funches, and D'Elia launched an 8-city comedy tour to promote the show.[27][28][29]

On May 5, 2015, the show was presented live in a one-hour episode that featured numerous guest stars.[10] Based on the reception to that episode, NBC made the decision to feature all live episodes for Season 3.[8]

Reception

Critical reception

Undateable has been met with mixed reviews from critics. On Rotten Tomatoes, the show holds a 38% rating, based on 16 reviews, with the consensus reading: "Largely bereft of originality or humor, Undateable is underwhelming."[30] On Metacritic, the show has a score of 50 out of 100 based on 19 critics, indicating "mixed or average reviews."[31]

Ratings

Season Timeslot (ET) Episodes Premiered Ended TV Season Rank Viewers
(in millions)
Date Premiere
Viewers
(in millions)
Date Finale
Viewers
(in millions)
1
Thursday 9:00 pm
13
May 29, 2014 (2014-05-29)
3.84[32]
July 3, 2014 (2014-07-03)
1.99[33] 2013–14 N/A 2.78[34]
2
Tuesday 9:00 pm
10
March 17, 2015 (2015-03-17)
6.43[35]
May 12, 2015 (2015-05-12)
4.01[36] 2014–15 109 5.11[37]
3
Friday 8:00 pm
13
October 9, 2015 (2015-10-09)
2.54[38]
TBA
TBA 2015–16 TBA TBA

Awards and nominations

Year Award Category Nominee(s) Result Ref
2015 Art Directors Award Multi-Camera Television Series Undateable - Episode: "Pilot" Nominated
Episode of a Multi-Camera, Variety or Unscripted Series Cabot McMullen (production designer), Jeffrey Beck (set designer), Susan Bolles (graphic designer), Amber Haley (set decorator) Nominated

References

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External links

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