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Video Distribution Amplifier

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Video Distribution Amplifier

In electronics, a distribution amplifier, or simply distribution amp or DA, is a device that accepts a single input signal and provides this same signal to multiple isolated outputs.

These devices are important because they allow a signal to be distributed to multiple destinations without ground loops or signal degradation. They are used for a number of common engineering tasks, including multiple amplification, cable television, splitting monitor and front of house mixes, and "tapping" a signal prior to sending it through effects units to preserve a "dry" signal for later experimentation.

Video distribution amplifier

A Video Distribution Amplifier (also known as a distribution amp or VDA) is a type of electronic equipment that takes a video signal as an input, amplifies it, and outputs the amplified video signal to two or more outputs. It is primarily used to supply a single video signal to multiple pieces of video equipment.

Function

Video signals can suffer deterioration over relatively short cable distances. To compensate for that loss, a Video Distribution Amplifier (VDA) is used.

A VDA adjusts the amplitude of a video signal to compensate for loss of signal in a video distribution system. Extending the distance of the video signal is the main purpose of the VDA.

There are VDAs built for all video formats, NTSC, ATSC, QAM16, QAM32, QAM64, Composite Video and Component Video.

Their construction and capabilities can be simple; accept input signal, amplify, then output. Others can be more sophisticated that allow remote control from a control station, allow adjustment of the gain, equalization, and provide status of the input and output signals through Ethernet networks.

See also

References

External links

  • Info about some very common distribution amplifier types.
  • Guide to HDMI Distribution Amp, switches and matrix


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