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Warbler

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Title: Warbler  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Pellorneidae, Wood warbler, Old World babbler, List of adaptive radiated Hawaiian honeycreepers by form, Songbird
Collection: Passeriformes, Warblers
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Warbler

There are a number of Passeriformes (perching birds) called warblers. They are not necessarily closely related to one another, but share some characteristics, such as being fairly small, vocal, and insectivorous.

They are mostly brownish or dull greenish in color. They tend to be more easily heard than seen. Identification can be difficult and may be made on the basis of song alone. To English-speaking Europeans, warblers are the archetypal "LBJs" (little brown jobs).

Contents

  • Sylvioid warblers 1
  • Passeroid warblers 2
  • Other 3
  • References 4

Sylvioid warblers

These are somewhat more closely related to each other than to other warblers. They belong to a superfamily also containing Old World babblers, bulbuls, etc.

Passeroid warblers

The two families of American warblers are part of another superfamily, which unites them with sparrows, buntings, finches, etc.

Other

These are closely related to the titmice and chickadees

These are the most distinct group of warblers. They are not closely related at all to the others, but rather to the honeyeaters and fairy-wrens.

References

  1. ^ Wilson, Eisner, Briggs, Dickerson, Metzenberg, O'Brien, Susman, & Boggs. Life on Earth, Chapter: Biogeography, Graphic: Hawaiian Honeycreepers, p. 857.
  • Wilson, Eisner, Briggs, Dickerson, Metzenberg, O'Brien, Susman, & Boggs. Life on Earth, Edward O. Wilson, Thomas Eisner, Winslow R. Briggs, Richard E. Dickerson, Robert L. Metzenberg, Richard D. O'Brien, Millard Susman, William E. Boggs, c 1973, Sinauer Associates, Inc., Publisher, Stamford, Connecticut. (hardcover, ISBN 0-87893-934-2)
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