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Yanina Wickmayer

Yanina Wickmayer
Country (sports)  Belgium
Residence Hasselt, Belgium
Born (1989-10-20) 20 October 1989
Lier, Belgium
Height 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in)
Turned pro 2004
Plays Right-handed (two-handed backhand)
Coach(es) Marc Wickmayer, An Devries
Prize money $3,571,201
Singles
Career record 317–187
Career titles 4 WTA, 10 ITF
Highest ranking No. 12 (19 April 2010)
Current ranking No. 56 (21 September 2015)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open 4R (2010, 2015)
French Open 3R (2010, 2011)
Wimbledon 4R (2011)
US Open SF (2009)
Other tournaments
Olympic Games 2R (2012)
Doubles
Career record 77–67
Career titles 1 WTA, 8 ITF
Highest ranking No. 71 (15 February 2010)
Current ranking No. 366 (14 September 2015)
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian Open 2R (2010)
French Open 1R (2008)
Wimbledon 2R (2009, 2013)
US Open 1R (2009)
Last updated on: 22 June 2014.

Yanina Wickmayer (born 20 October 1989) is a Belgian professional tennis player. She reached her career-high WTA ranking of world no. 12 on 19 April 2010. She is also known for reaching the semifinals at the 2009 US Open. She won the award for "WTA Most Improved Player" in 2009.


In June 2011, Time Magazine named her one of the "30 Legends of Women's Tennis: Past, Present and Future".[1]

Contents

  • Tennis career 1
    • 2006 1.1
    • 2007 1.2
    • 2008: 1st WTA Final 1.3
    • 2009: US Open Semifinal 1.4
    • 2010: Top 15 Ranking 1.5
    • 2011: Continued Success 1.6
    • 2012: In the Top 30 1.7
    • 2013: Struggles With Form 1.8
    • 2014: Continued Downfall 1.9
    • 2015: 1st WTA Title since 2010 1.10
  • Personal 2
  • WTA career finals 3
    • Singles: 10 (4 titles, 6 runners-up) 3.1
    • WTA 125s finals 3.2
    • Doubles: 2 (1 winner, 1 runner-up) 3.3
  • ITF Circuit finals (32) 4
    • Singles: 17 (10–7) 4.1
    • Doubles: 13 (8–5) 4.2
  • Performance timeline 5
  • Doubles performance timeline 6
  • References 7
  • External links 8

Tennis career

2006

Wickmayer obtained her first successes: three singles ITF titles and two ITF doubles.

2007

Wickmayer continued her success on the ITF circuit by winning several tournaments in Asia during the fall season (see external links). It was around this time that Wickmayer surpassed Caroline Maes as the no. 2 Belgian female tennis player. At the start of the year, Wickmayer was no. 534 in the world, but by November 2007, was around no. 170. Wickmayer had won eight singles titles and seven doubles titles on the ITF circuit. She was also selected by team captain Sabine Appelmans to represent the Belgium Fed Cup team at the 2007 Fed Cup. She lost to Venus Williams, 1–6, 2–6, in her World Group match, before winning one rubber and losing the other against Chinese opposition.

2008: 1st WTA Final

In the 2008 Fed Cup tie versus Ukraine, Wickmayer sprang a surprise victory over reigning Australian Open women's doubles champion Kateryna Bondarenko.[2] Wickmayer qualified in singles for the French Open, but lost 2–6, 5–7 in the first round to Akgul Amanmuradova of Uzbekistan. She reached the final of the DFS Classic, but lost, 6–7, 6–3, 6–7, to Kateryna Bondarenko of Ukraine.

At Wimbledon, Wickmayer lost in the first round to Japan's Ai Sugiyama, 4–6, 2–6.

2009: US Open Semifinal

Yanina Wickmayer in a 2009 US Open match with Petra Kvitová

Wickmayer started the year with first-round losses in both Brisbane and the Australian Open. She won her first tour match of the year at Indian Wells, defeating Magdaléna Rybáriková, 6–3, 6–2. She lost to Daniela Hantuchová in the second round, despite holding two match points. She then lost her first-round matches in Miami and Charleston.

Wickmayer won her first WTA Tour singles title in Estoril. She beat third seed Sorana Cîrstea, 6–4, 1–6, 6–4, en route to the final, where she defeated Ekaterina Makarova, 7–5, 6–2. At the 2009 French Open, she was beaten by Samantha Stosur in the second round, 3–6, 6–4, 4–6.

Wickmayer lost to a newly returned Maria Sharapova in the quarterfinals at the 2009 Aegon Classic in Birmingham, 1–6, 6–2, 3–6. At the 2009 Ordina Open, Wickmayer reached both the singles final and the doubles final, losing to Tamarine Tanasugarn in the singles final. The doubles final was a close contest, in which she lost in three sets to an Italian pairing. At Wimbledon, she lost in the first round to Elena Vesnina.

During the summer hard-court season, Wickmayer reached the third round in Los Angeles, losing to Vera Zvonareva. She was defeated in the early rounds of her three other summer tournaments. At the 2009 U.S. Open, Wickmayer lost in the semifinals to Caroline Wozniacki, 3–6, 3–6.

Wickmayer fell in the first round in Beijing to Alisa Kleybanova. She qualified for the year-end championships in Bali. Her next tournament was in Linz. She won through to the semifinals, where she upset top seed Flavia Pennetta for her biggest career win. She beat Petra Kvitová in the final, 6–3, 6–4, and as a result made it into the top 20 for the first time. One week later at the 2009 BGL Luxembourg Open she won through to the semifinals, where she was edged by Timea Bacsinszky, 6–3, 2–6, 5–7.

Wickmayer's last tournament of the year was at the year-end championships in Bali. Drawn into Group C, she defeated Kimiko Date-Krumm in her first match in straight sets, 7–6, 6–3. She was supposed to face Anabel Medina Garrigues next, but was disqualified from the tournament due to doping allegations. This was her last tournament of 2009.

On 1 October 2009, it was announced that Wickmayer and fellow Belgian tennis professional Xavier Malisse were to defend themselves before the Flemish anti-doping tribunal for failing to properly fill out their whereabouts. Wickmayer replied in a press release that the failure to follow procedure was due to her not being able to log on to the relevant website, not being able to contact the right people when needed, and not being in the country when written admonitions arrived by mail.[3] At the tribunal on 22 October 2009, the prosecution did not ask for a ban, but rather for a "principal restraint" of the facts that they were being accused of,[4] and as such it was expected that this would not cause any problems for either athlete.

However, on 5 November 2009, the decision of the tribunal was announced, an effective one-year ban for both players.[5] Wickmayer, as well as Malisse, appealed the final decision, and her ban was lifted on 16 December 2009, after the appeal was granted.[6]

2010: Top 15 Ranking

Yanina Wickmayer at the 2010 Stuttgart Porsche Cup

Wickmayer accepted a wildcard into the first tournament of the year, the ASB Classic in Auckland. Seeded third, she defeated first seed Flavia Pennetta in the final, winning the tournament without dropping a set. This title was her first title of the year and third of her career.

Due to Wickmayer's suspensions being lifted after the deadline for the Australian Open, Wickmayer was forced to enter the qualifying draw. After a nervous first-round qualifying, she easily won through to the main draw. Being a dangerous floater, she drew Alexandra Dulgheru in the first round. In a match that included numerous rain delays, she prevailed, 1–6 7–5 10–8. Wickmayer defeated two Italian players, 12th seed, Flavia Pennetta and Sara Errani in the second and third round respectively, but lost in three sets to Justine Henin in the fourth round. Despite the loss she moved up to a career-high of no. 15.

Wickmayer was selected to represent Belgium at the World Group II Fed Cup tie against Poland. Wickmayer won both her rubbers against Marta Domachowska and Agnieszka Radwańska, thus allowing Kirsten Flipkens to secure the tie for Belgium with a win against Domachowska, to advance to the World Group playoff.[7]

In her next two tournaments, the Open GDF Suez tournament in Paris and the 2010 Dubai Tennis Championships in Dubai, Wickmayer lost in first-round matches, in Paris to Petra Martić;[8] and in Dubai to Shahar Pe'er.[9]

Wickmayer fared better in the BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells, where she won two matches, before losing in the round of 16 to María José Martínez Sánchez of Spain, who had upset sixth seed Victoria Azarenka in the previous round. She then travelled to Miami for the Premier Mandatory Sony Ericsson Open. Seeded 12th, in the fourth round she thrashed Timea Bacsinszky, 6–0, 6–1. Despite losing 4–6, 5–7 to Marion Bartoli in a close quarterfinal match, her strong performance brought her to a new career-high ranking of world no. 13, moving to 12 without playing the next week.

Wickmayer was again selected to represent Belgium at the Fed Cup World Group playoff tie against Estonia. When Kim Clijsters and Wickmayer won their singles rubbers on Saturday, Belgium was in a comfortable lead. However, Clijsters had injured her foot and had to be replaced by Justine Henin, who herself had been injured earlier that week. Henin lost her rubber, so it fell on Wickmayer to bring home the tie during the fourth, which she did in three sets, 2–6, 6–1, 6–1. At the Porsche Tennis Grand Prix held in Stuttgart, Wickmayer moved to the second round, before falling for the second consecutive time to fellow Belgian and former world no. 1 Justine Henin, 3–6, 5–7. Her next tournament was the Internazionali BNL d'Italia in Rome, where she was seeded 11th. She defeated Karolina Šprem and Aravane Rezaï in the first two rounds, before losing to seventh seeded Jelena Janković in the third round, 2–6, 0–6. As she was defending the points for her 2009 Estoril win during this week, but lost too early in the tournament, this week marked the first in a long time in which she lost ranking points.

Wickmayer pulled out of her next tournament, citing a right elbow injury, and underwent surgery. Though Roland Garros was only two weeks later, she managed to be fit in time and played there as 16th seed. She defeated Sandra Záhlavová in the first round, 6–1, 6–1 and Sybille Bammer, 7–6, 1–6, 7–5, before falling to Daniela Hantuchová, 5–7, 3–6. Despite her recent injury, this was her best French Open performance to date.

Yanina Wickmayer at the 2010 US Open

Wickmayer reached the quarterfinals in Birmingham, where she lost to qualifier Alison Riske. The next week, she had 200 ranking points to defend from her 2009 's-Hertogenbosch final. She decided to play in Eastbourne, however, where she was not seeded due to the strong players field. She lost to fifth seed Kim Clijsters, 1–6, 1–6. Wickmayer defeated Riske in a tough first-round match at the Wimbledon Championships, her first Wimbledon main draw win. She reached the third round, after defeating compatriot Kirsten Flipkens, but lost to 21st seed Vera Zvonareva. The day before their second round match, Flipkens and Wickmayer played doubles together, which they lost. Wickmayer also lost her first mixed doubles match with Dick Norman. After Wimbledon, she rose to no. 16 once again, the third Belgian after Kim Clijsters and Justine Henin.

At the 2010 Bank of the West Classic, Wickmayer fell to top seed Sam Stosur in the quarterfinals. She was seeded 8th at the 2010 Mercury Insurance Open, but fell to Svetlana Kuznetsova in the first round. Wickmayer was seeded 15th at the 2010 US Open, with semifinal ranking points to defend. She advanced to the fourth round, before falling in three sets to 31st seed Kaia Kanepi.

2011: Continued Success

Wickmayer returned to Auckland to defend her 2010 championship. Seeded second, she lost in the final to Gréta Arn, 3–6, 3–6. She was seeded 21st at the 2011 Australian Open. She lost in the second round to Lativan Anastasija Sevastova, 4–6, 2–6, citing illness. Wickmayer reached the quarterfinals of the 2011 Open GDF Suez, where she lost to Petra Kvitová in a tight three-sets match, 7–5, 3–6, 6–7.

At the 2011 Dubai Tennis Championships, Wickmayer lost to ninth seed Shahar Pe'er, 6–3, 4–6, 1–6, in the third round. Wickmayer's next event was the 2011 BNP Paribas Open, where she competed as the 23rd seed. She lost in the semifinal to 15th seed Marion Bartoli, 1–6, 3–6. This was her first semifinal ever in Indian Wells. At the 2011 Sony Ericsson Open, Wickmayer was the 23rd seed. After a first-round bye, she was defeated by Russian Elena Vesnina, 2–6, 7–5, 4–6.

Wickmayer was seeded 21st at the 2011 French Open and beat both Monica Niculescu and Japan's Ayumi Morita in straight sets, before losing to 12th seed Agnieszka Radwańska, 4–6, 4–6 in the third round, matching her 2010 performance. As the third seed, Wickmayer reached the quarterfinals of the 2011 UNICEF Open, falling to eventual champion Roberta Vinci. Wickmayer was the 19th seed at the 2011 Wimbledon Championships. She beat Varvara Lepchenko, Anna Tatishvili, and 12th seed Svetlana Kuznetsova to reach the fourth round for the first time, where she lost to eighth seed and eventual winner Petra Kvitová.

During the summer, Wickmayer took part in the 2011 Rogers Cup, where she lost to Roberta Vinci in the first round. She then played 2011 Western & Southern Open and lost in the second round. At the Virginia Slims of Dallas, she retired in the first round against Sofia Arvidsson with a back injury.[10] At the 2011 US Open, after having won her first match 6–1, 7–5 against Sorana Cîrstea, she withdrew in the second round against Alla Kudryavtseva due to the same back injury. She then sat out the fall Asian tour.

2012: In the Top 30

2013: Struggles With Form

Wickmayer started her 2013 year at the 2013 ASB Classic where she was the 3rd seed. Wickmayer made it all the way to the Final by beating Magdaléna Rybáriková 7-6(3),6-2; Romina Oprandi 6-3,6-0; compatriot Kirsten Flipkens 6-3,6-4; and 8th seed Mona Barthel 6-4,1-6,7-6(3). In the Final, Wickmayer lost to 1st seed Agnieszka Radwańska 6-4,6-4. At the 2013 Apia International Sydney, Wickmayer lost in the 1st round to Qualifier Galina Voskoboeva 3-6,7-6(5),6-2. Wickmayer was the 20th seed at the 2013 Australian Open. In the 1st round, Wickmayer beat wildcard Jarmila Gajdošová6-1,7-5. In the 2nd round, she beat Jana Čepelová 7-6(8),7-5. In the 3rd round, Wickmayer lost to 14th seed Maria Kirilenko 7-6(4),6-3. After the Australian Open, Wickmayer played at the 2013 Open GDF Suez in Paris, France. In the 1st round, Wickmayer beat Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova 7-6(7),4-6,6-3. In the 2nd round, Wickmayer lost to French Wildcard and eventual semifinalist Kristina Mladenovic 6-4,6-4. Then, Wickmayer played Fed Cup for Belgium as Belgium faced Switzerland. Wickmayer beat Stefanie Vögele in her 1st rubber 6-1,4-6,8-6. In her final Rubber, Wickmayer lost to Romina Oprandi 6-2,6-2. Switzerland beat Belgium 4-1. At the 2013 Qatar Total Open, Wickmayer lost in the 1st round to 15th seed Roberta Vinci 6-2,2-1 ret. Wickmayer was the 30th seed at the 2013 BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells, California. She received a bye to the 2nd round. In the 2nd round, Wickmayer beat Qualifier Mirjana Lucic-Baroni 3-6,6-3,6-2. In the 3rd round, she lost to 4th seed and eventual semifinalist Angelique Kerber 6-1,7-6(4). Wickmayer was the 31st seed at the 2013 Sony Ericsson Open; she also received a bye to the 2nd round. In the 2nd round, Wickmayer lost to Ayumi Morita 7-6(2),2-6,6-3. After Miami, Wickmayer traveled to Mexico to play at the 2013 Monterrey Open where she was the 6th seed. In the 1st round, Wickmayer beat Valeria Savinykh 4-6,6-1,6-4. In the 2nd round, she lost to Monica Niculescu 6-4,3-6,6-1.

2014: Continued Downfall

Wickmayer started her 2014 year by playing at the 2014 ASB Classic where she made it to the final last year. In the 1st round, she lost to Qualifier Kristýna Plíšková 7-6(3),6-0. Next, Wickmayer played at the 2014 Moorilla Hobart International. In the 1st round, she beat Laura Robson 4-6,2-0 ret. Robson retired due to a left wrist injury. In the 2nd round, Wickmayer retired to Qualifier and eventual Champion Garbiñe Muguruza with a score of 4-1. At the 2014 Australian Open, Wickmayer beat Dinah Pfizenmaier in the 1st round 7-6(5),6-3. In the 2nd round, Wickmayer lost easily to Alison Riske 6-1,6-1.

2015: 1st WTA Title since 2010

Wickmayer started her 2015 year by competing at the 2015 ASB Classic. She lost in the 1st round to Taylor Townsend 7-5,3-6,6-0. Then, Wickmayer played Qualifying at the 2015 Apia International Sydney. Wickmayer lost in the 1st round of Qualifying to Tímea Babos 3-6,6-1,6-2. At the 2015 Australian Open, Wickmayer beat 23rd seed Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova in the 1st round 4-6,6-3,6-3. In the 2nd round, Wickmayer beat Lara Arruabarrena 6-4,4-6,6-4. In the 3rd round, Wickmayer beat 14th seed Sara Errani 4-6,6-4,6-3 to reach the 4th round for the 1st time since 2010. In the 4th round, Wickmayer lost for the 1st time to 3rd seed Simona Halep 6-4,6-2 after Wickmayer had led their Head to Head 3-0.


Personal

Her mother, Daniella Dannevoye, died at an early age.[11] Wickmayer is named after Maradona's youngest daughter Giannina. The surname 'Wickmayer' traces back to Austria through her father Marc. She fluently speaks Dutch, English and French.

WTA career finals

Singles: 10 (4 titles, 6 runners-up)

Winner – Legend (pre/post 2010)
Grand Slam tournaments (0–0)
WTA Tour Championships (0–0)
Tier I / Premier Mandatory & Premier 5 (0–0)
Tier II / Premier (0–0)
Tier III, IV & V / International (4–6)
WTA 125s tournaments (0–1)
Titles by Surface
Hard (3–3)
Grass (0–2)
Clay (1–1)
Carpet (0–1)
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent in final Score in final
Runner-up 1. 9 June 2008 Aegon Classic, Birmingham, United Kingdom Grass Kateryna Bondarenko 6–7(7–9), 6–3, 6–7(4–7)
Winner 1. 8 May 2009 Estoril Open, Estoril, Portugal Clay Ekaterina Makarova 7–5, 6–2
Runner-up 2. 20 June 2009 Ordina Open, 's-Hertogenbosch, Netherlands Grass Tamarine Tanasugarn 3–6, 5–7
Winner 2. 18 October 2009 Generali Ladies Linz, Linz, Austria Hard Petra Kvitová 6–3, 6–4
Winner 3. 9 January 2010 ASB Classic, Auckland, New Zealand Hard Flavia Pennetta 6–3, 6–2
Runner-up 3. 8 January 2011 ASB Classic, Auckland, New Zealand Hard Gréta Arn 3–6, 3–6
Runner-up 4. 15 January 2012 Moorilla Hobart International, Hobart, Australia Hard Mona Barthel 1–6, 2–6
Runner-up 5. 17 June 2012 Gastein Ladies, Bad Gastein, Austria Clay Alizé Cornet 5–7, 6–7(1–7)
Runner-up 6. 6 January 2013 ASB Classic, Auckland, New Zealand Hard Agnieszka Radwańska 4–6, 4–6
Winner 4. 20 September 2015 Japan Women's Open, Tokyo, Japan Hard Magda Linette 4–6, 6–3, 6–3

WTA 125s finals

Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent in final Score in final
Runner-up 1. 4 November 2013 Taipei, Taiwan Carpet (indoor) Alison Van Uytvanck 4–6, 2–6

Doubles: 2 (1 winner, 1 runner-up)

Winner – Legend (pre/post 2010)
Grand Slam tournaments (0–0)
WTA Tour Championships (0–0)
Tier I / Premier Mandatory & Premier 5 (0–0)
Tier II / Premier (0–0)
Tier III, IV & V / International (1–1)
Titles by Surface
Hard (1–0)
Grass (0–1)
Clay (0–0)
Carpet (0–0)
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponents Score
Runner-up 1. 19 June 2009 Ordina Open, 's-Hertogenbosch, Netherlands Grass Michaëlla Krajicek Sara Errani
Flavia Pennetta
4–6, 7–5, [11–13]
Winner 1. 20 October 2013 BGL Luxembourg Open, Luxembourg, Luxembourg Hard (i) Stephanie Vogt Kristina Barrois
Laura Thorpe
7–6(7–2), 6–4

ITF Circuit finals (32)

Singles: 17 (10–7)

$100,000 tournaments
$75,000 tournaments
$50,000 tournaments
$25,000 tournaments
$10,000 tournaments
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent Score
Runner-up 1. 14 May 2006 Edinburgh, United Kingdom Clay Mari Andersson 6–0, 1–6, 3–6
Winner 1. 20 August 2006 Koksijde, Belgium Clay Kristina Steiert 6–4, 6–1
Winner 2. 19 November 2006 Florianópolis, Brazil Clay Estefania Craciún 6–1, 6–0
Winner 3. 26 November 2006 Córdoba, Argentina Clay Teliana Pereira 6–1, 6–7(4–7), 6–0
Runner-up 2. 15 April 2007 Torhout, Belgium Hard Claire Feuerstein 4–6, 4–6
Winner 4. 29 July 2007 Les Contamines, France Hard Julie Coin 6–2, 7–6(7–3)
Winner 5. 28 October 2007 Hamanako, Japan Carpet Junri Namigata 4–6, 6–4, 6–2
Runner-up 3. 4 November 2007 Taoyuan City, Taiwan Hard Akiko Morigami 4–6, 6–7(5–7)
Winner 6. 11 November 2007 Taizhou, China Hard Han Xinyun 6–2, 6–2
Winner 7. 18 November 2007 Kunming, China Hard Urszula Radwańska 7–5, 6–4
Runner-up 4. 15 March 2008 New Delhi, India Hard Ekaterina Dzehalevich 6–2, 3–6, 2–6
Runner-up 5. 13 April 2008 Monzón, Spain Hard Petra Kvitová 6–2, 4–6, 5–7
Winner 8. 11 May 2008 Indian Harbour Beach, USA Clay Bethanie Mattek 6–4, 7–5
Winner 9. 22 February 2009 Surprise, USA Hard Julia Vakulenko 6–7(0–7), 6–3, 4–3, retired
Runner-up 6. 1 March 2009 Clearwater, United States Hard Julie Coin 6–3, 1–1 retired
Runner-up 7. 17 March 2009 Saint-Gaudens, France Clay Anastasiya Yakimova 5–7, 6–7(0–7)
Winner 10. 17 October 2010 Torhout, Belgium Hard Simona Halep 6–3, 6–2

Doubles: 13 (8–5)

$100,000 tournaments
$75,000 tournaments
$50,000 tournaments
$25,000 tournaments
$10,000 tournaments
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponent Score
Winner 1. 11 November 2006 Itajaí, Brazil Clay Teliana Pereira Fernanda Hermenegildo
Monika Kochanová
6–3, 6–3
Winner 2. 26 November 2006 Córdoba, Argentina Clay Teliana Pereira Florencia Molinero
Veronika Spiegel
7–5, 6–4
Winner 3. 18 May 2007 Trivandrum, India Clay Lauren Albanese Nicole Clerico
Agnes Szatmari
3–6, 7–5, 6–0
Winner 4. 8 July 2007 Stuttgart-Vaihingen, Germany Clay Ekaterina Dzehalevich Darija Jurak
Carmen Klaschka
6–3, 6–2
Winner 5. 28 July 2007 Les Contamines, France Hard Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova Petra Cetkovská
Sandra Záhlavová
Walkover
Runner-up 1. 1 August 2007 Coimbra, Portugal Hard Magdalena Kiszczyńska Kira Nagy
Neuza Silva
3–6, 6–3, 7–5
Runner-up 2. 21 October 2007 Makinohara, Japan Carpet Lauren Albanese Airi Hagimoto
Sakiko Shimizu
7–5, 6–3
Winner 6. 18 November 2007 Kunming, China Hard Urszula Radwańska Han Xinyun
Xu Yifan
6–4, 6–1
Winner 7. 6 April 2008 Torhout, Belgium Hard Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova Stéphanie Cohen-Aloro
Selima Sfar
6–4, 4–6, [10–8]
Runner-up 3. 22 February 2009 Surprise, United States Hard Ahsha Rolle Jorgelina Cravero
Ekaterina Lopes
6–1, 6–1
Runner-up 4. 1 March 2009 Clearwater, United States Hard Maria Elena Camerin Lucie Hradecká
Michaela Paštiková
walkover
Winner 8. 10 April 2009 Torhout, Belgium Hard Michaëlla Krajicek Julia Görges
Sandra Klemenschits
6–4, 6–0
Runner-up 5. 17 October 2010 Torhout, Belgium Hard Michaëlla Krajicek Timea Bacsinszky
Tathiana Garbin
6–4, 6–2

Performance timeline

Key
W  F  SF QF R# RR LQ (Q#) A P Z# PO SF-B F-S G NMS NH

Won tournament; or reached Final; Semifinal; Quarter-final; Round 4, 3, 2, 1; competed at a Round Robin stage; lost in Qualification Round; absent from tournament event; played in a Davis Cup - / Fed Cup Zonal Group (with its number indication) or Play-off; won a bronze, silver (F or S) or gold medal at the Olympics; a downgraded Masters Series/1000 tournament (Not a Masters Series); or a tournament that was Not Held in a given year.

To avoid confusion and double counting, these charts are updated either at the conclusion of a tournament, or when the player's participation in the tournament has ended.
Tournament 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 W–L
Australian Open A A Q2 1R 4R 2R 1R 3R 2R 4R 10-7
French Open A A 1R 2R 3R 3R 1R 1R 2R 6–7
Wimbledon A A 1R 1R 3R 4R 3R 1R 2R 8–7
US Open A A 1R SF 4R 2R 2R 1R 1R 10–7
Win–Loss 0–0 0–0 0–3 6–4 10–4 7–4 3–4 2–4 3–4 3–1 33–27
WTA Premier Mandatory Tournaments
Indian Wells A A A 2R 4R SF 2R 3R 2R 9–6
Miami A A A 1R QF 2R 4R 2R 1R 5–6
Madrid Not Held A A 1R 2R 1R A 1–3
Beijing Not Held A 1R A 1R A 0–2
WTA Premier 5 Tournaments
Dubai Not Held A 1R 3R Not Premier 5 2–2
Doha Not Tier I A Not Held NP5 QF 1R QF 6–3
Rome A A A A 3R 3R 1R 2R A 5–4
Canada A A A 1R 2R 1R 1R 2R 1R 2–6
Cincinnati Not Held 2R QF 2R 1R 1R 1R 5–6
Tokyo A A A A 1R A 1R A 0–2
Career statistics
Year End Ranking 534 221 69 16 23 26 23 51

Doubles performance timeline

Key
W  F  SF QF R# RR LQ (Q#) A P Z# PO SF-B F-S G NMS NH

Won tournament; or reached Final; Semifinal; Quarter-final; Round 4, 3, 2, 1; competed at a Round Robin stage; lost in Qualification Round; absent from tournament event; played in a Davis Cup - / Fed Cup Zonal Group (with its number indication) or Play-off; won a bronze, silver (F or S) or gold medal at the Olympics; a downgraded Masters Series/1000 tournament (Not a Masters Series); or a tournament that was Not Held in a given year.

To avoid confusion and double counting, these charts are updated either at the conclusion of a tournament, or when the player's participation in the tournament has ended.
Tournament 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 W–L
Australian Open 1R 2R 1R 2R 1R 2–5
French Open 1R 1R 1R 0–3
Wimbledon 2R 1R 1R 2R 2–4
US Open 1R 1R 1R 1R 0–4
Win–Loss 0–2 1–4 1–3 0–1 0–2 2–3 0–1 4–16

References

  1. ^
  2. ^ Wickmayer pulls Belgium level Fed Cup website
  3. ^
  4. ^
  5. ^ Sportwereld – 'Yanina is helemaal gebroken' (Dutch). Nieuwsblad.be (6 November 2009). Retrieved 29 June 2011.
  6. ^ Individual News Story. Tennis Channel. Retrieved 29 June 2011.
  7. ^
  8. ^
  9. ^
  10. ^ "Injury ends Wickmayer participation" The Press Association at Google
  11. ^

External links

Awards
Preceded by
Dinara Safina
WTA Most Improved Player
2009
Succeeded by
Francesca Schiavone
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