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Znf638

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Title: Znf638  
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Znf638

Zinc finger protein 638
Identifiers
Symbols  ; NP220; ZFML; Zfp638
External IDs GeneCards:
RNA expression pattern
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez
Ensembl
UniProt
RefSeq (mRNA)
RefSeq (protein)
Location (UCSC)
PubMed search

Zinc finger protein 638 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the ZNF638 gene.[1][2] The protein encoded by this gene is a nucleoplasmic protein. It binds cytidine-rich sequences in double-stranded DNA. This protein has three types of domains: MH1, MH2 (repeated three times) and MH3. It is associated with packaging, transferring, or processing transcripts. Multiple alternatively spliced transcript variants have been found for this gene, but the biological validity of some variants has not been determined.[2]

Contents

  • Interactions 1
  • References 2
  • Further reading 3
  • External links 4

Interactions

ZNF638 has been shown to interact with FHL2.[3]

References

  1. ^ Inagaki H, Matsushima Y, Nakamura K, Ohshima M, Kadowaki T, Kitagawa Y (Jul 1996). "A large DNA-binding nuclear protein with RNA recognition motif and serine/arginine-rich domain". J Biol Chem 271 (21): 12525–31.  
  2. ^ a b "Entrez Gene: ZNF638 zinc finger protein 638". 
  3. ^ Ng, Enders Kai On; Chan Kwok Keung; Wong Chi Hang; Tsui Stephen Kwok Wing; Ngai Sai Ming; Lee Simon Ming Yuen; Kotaka Masayo; Lee Cheuk Yu; Waye Mary Miu Yee; Fung Kwok Pui (2002). "Interaction of the heart-specific LIM domain protein, FHL2, with DNA-binding nuclear protein, hNP220". J. Cell. Biochem. (United States) 84 (3): 556–66.  

Further reading

  • Okumara K, Nogami M, Matsushima Y, et al. (1998). "Mapping of human DNA-binding nuclear protein (NP220) to chromosome band 2p13.1-p13.2 and its relation to matrin 3.". Biosci. Biotechnol. Biochem. 62 (8): 1640–2.  
  • Eichmuller S, Usener D, Dummer R, et al. (2001). "Serological detection of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma-associated antigens.". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 98 (2): 629–34.  
  • Ng EK, Chan KK, Wong CH, et al. (2002). "Interaction of the heart-specific LIM domain protein, FHL2, with DNA-binding nuclear protein, hNP220.". J. Cell. Biochem. 84 (3): 556–66.  
  • Strausberg RL, Feingold EA, Grouse LH, et al. (2003). "Generation and initial analysis of more than 15,000 full-length human and mouse cDNA sequences.". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99 (26): 16899–903.  
  • Ota T, Suzuki Y, Nishikawa T, et al. (2004). "Complete sequencing and characterization of 21,243 full-length human cDNAs.". Nat. Genet. 36 (1): 40–5.  
  • Beausoleil SA, Jedrychowski M, Schwartz D, et al. (2004). "Large-scale characterization of HeLa cell nuclear phosphoproteins.". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 101 (33): 12130–5.  
  • Gerhard DS, Wagner L, Feingold EA, et al. (2004). "The status, quality, and expansion of the NIH full-length cDNA project: the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC).". Genome Res. 14 (10B): 2121–7.  
  • Benzinger A, Muster N, Koch HB, et al. (2005). "Targeted proteomic analysis of 14-3-3 sigma, a p53 effector commonly silenced in cancer.". Mol. Cell Proteomics 4 (6): 785–95.  
  • Hillier LW, Graves TA, Fulton RS, et al. (2005). "Generation and annotation of the DNA sequences of human chromosomes 2 and 4.". Nature 434 (7034): 724–31.  
  • Rual JF, Venkatesan K, Hao T, et al. (2005). "Towards a proteome-scale map of the human protein-protein interaction network.". Nature 437 (7062): 1173–8.  
  • Nousiainen M, Silljé HH, Sauer G, et al. (2006). "Phosphoproteome analysis of the human mitotic spindle.". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 103 (14): 5391–6.  
  • Beausoleil SA, Villén J, Gerber SA, et al. (2006). "A probability-based approach for high-throughput protein phosphorylation analysis and site localization.". Nat. Biotechnol. 24 (10): 1285–92.  
  • Olsen JV, Blagoev B, Gnad F, et al. (2006). "Global, in vivo, and site-specific phosphorylation dynamics in signaling networks.". Cell 127 (3): 635–48.  

External links


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