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Book of A Thousand Nights and a Night, The (Arabian Nights) — Volume 01

By: Anonymous

This is a collection of stories collected over thousands of years by various authors, translators and scholars. The are an amalgam of mythology and folk tales from the Indian sub-continent, Persia, and Arabia. No original manuscript has ever been found for the collection, but several versions date the collection's genesis to somewhere between AD 800-900. The stories are wound together under the device of a long series of cliff-hangers told by Shahrazad to her husband Shahryar, to prevent him from executing her. Many tales that have become independently famous come from the Book, among them Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves, and the voyages of Sinbad the Sailor. This collection comes from the first of sixteen volumes translated by Burton. (Based on Wikipedia article)...

Adventure, Fairy tales, Short stories, Myths/Legends

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Strange Manuscript Found in a Copper Cylinder, A

By: James De Mille

A Strange Manuscript Found in a Copper Cylinder is the most popular of James De Mille's works. It was serialized posthumously in Harper's Weekly, and published in book form by Harper and Brothers of New York City in 1888. This satiric romance is the story of Adam More, a British sailor. Shipwrecked in Antarctica, he stumbles upon a tropical lost world of prehistoric animals, plants, and a cult of death-worshipping primitives. He also finds a highly developed human society which has reversed the values of Victorian society. Wealth is scorned and poverty revered; death and darkness are preferrable to life and light. Rather than accumulating wealth, the natives seek to divest themselves of it as quickly as possible. At the beginning of each year, the government imposes wealth (the burden of reverse taxation) upon its unfortunate subjects as a form of punishment. A secondary plot about the four yachtsmen who find the manuscript forms a frame for the central narrative. [Condensed from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Strange_Manuscript_Found_in_a_Copper_Cylinder ]...

Adventure, Satire

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Catherine : A Story

By: William Makepeace Thackeray

Excerpt: Advertisement. The story of ?Catherine,? which appeared in Fraser?s Magazine in 1839-40, was written by Mr. Thackeray, under the name of Ikey Solomons, Jun., to counteract the injurious influence of some popular fictions of that day, which made heroes of highwaymen and burglars, and created a false sympathy for the vicious and criminal....

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The Life and Strange Surprizing Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, Of York, Mariner : Who Lived Eight and Twenty Years All Alone in an Un-Inhabited Island on the Coast of America, Near the Mouth of the Great River of Oroonoque; Having Been Cast on Shore by Shipwreck, Wherein All the Men Perished but Himself, With an Account How He Was at Last as Strangely Deliver'D by Pyrates

By: Daniel Defoe

Excerpt: THE PREFACE; If ever the story of any private Man?s Adventures in the World were worth making Publick, and were acceptable when Publish?d, the Editor of this Account thinks this will be so. The Wonders of this Man?s Life exceed all that (he thinks)is to be found extant; the Life of one Man being scarce capable of a greater Variety. The Story is told with Modesty, with Seriousness, and with a religious Application of Events to the Uses to which wise Men always apply them (viz.) to the Instruction of others by this Example, and to justify and honour the Wisdom of Providence in all the Variety of our Circumstances, let them happen how they will. The Editor believes the thing to be a just History of Fact; neither is there any Appearance of Fiction in it: And however thinks, because all such things are dispatch?d, that the Improvement of it, as well to the Diversion, as to the Instruction of the Reader, will be the same; and as such, he thinks, without father Compliment to the World, he does them a great Service in the Publication....

Table of Contents: THE PREFACE, 1 -- THE LIFE AND ADVENTURES OF ROBINSON CRUSOE, &c., 2 -- THE JOURNAL., 51

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Agricola

By: Publius Cornelius Tacitus

The Agricola (Latin: De vita et moribus Iulii Agricolae, lit. On the life and character of Julius Agricola) is a book by the Roman historian Tacitus, written c 98, which recounts the life of his father-in-law Gnaeus Julius Agricola, an eminent Roman general. It also covers, briefly, the geography and ethnography of ancient Britain. As in the Germania, Tacitus favorably contrasts the liberty of the native Britons to the corruption and tyranny of the Empire; the book also contains eloquent and vicious polemics against the rapacity and greed of Rome. This translation by Alfred John Church and William Jackson Brodribb, was first published in 1877. (Summary from Wikipedia.)...

History, Biography

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Memories and Portraits

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

Excerpt: Chapter 1. The Foreigner At Home. ?This is no my ain house; I ken by the biggin? o?t.? Two recent books* one by Mr. Grant White on England, one on France by the diabolically clever Mr. Hillebrand, may well have set people thinking on the divisions of races and nations. Such thoughts should arise with particular congruity and force to inhabitants of that United Kingdom, peopled from so many different stocks, babbling so many different dialects, and offering in its extent such singular contrasts, from the busiest over-population to the unkindliest desert, from the Black Country to the Moor of Rannoch. It is not only when we cross the seas that we go abroad; there are foreign parts of England; and the race that has conquered so wide an empire has not yet managed to assimilate the islands whence she sprang. Ireland, Wales, and the Scottish mountains still cling, in part, to their old Gaelic speech. It was but the other day that English triumphed in Cornwall, and they still show in Mousehole, on St. Michael?s Bay, the house of the last Cornish-speaking woman. English itself, which will now frank the traveller through the most of...

Contents CHAPTER I: THE FOREIGNER AT HOME ..................................................................................... 5 CHAPTER II: SOME COLLEGE MEMORIES................................................................................ 14 CHAPTER III: OLD MORTALITY .................................................................................................. 20 CHAPTER IV: A COLLEGE MAGAZINE ...................................................................................... 28 CHAPTER V: AN OLD SCOTCH GARDENER ............................................................................. 36 CHAPTER VI: PASTORAL .............................................................................................................. 41 CHAPTER VII: THE MANSE .......................................................................................................... 48 CHAPTER VIII: MEMOIRS OF AN ISLET .................................................................................... 53 CHAPTER IX: THOMAS STEVENSON ? CIVIL ENGINEER...................................................... 58 CHAPTER X: TALK AND TALKERS ....................

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History of the Hawaiian Kingdom Vol. 1

By: Ralph S. Kuykendall

R. S. Kuykendall spent four decades of his life writing the history of Hawaii. He came to the Islands in 1922 as executive secretary of the newly formed Historical Commission of the Territory of Hawaii. The Commission planned, among other projects, to publish a large-scale history: a general narrative of a thousand pages or more, sufficiently documented to ensure "authoritativeness. " Working to this mandate, Kuykendall brought to bear on his task everything he could muster in the way of personal and professional resources. He was well suited to the sort of pioneer labor that faced him. He had a great appetite and aptitude for spadework of an archival kind, locating, acquiring, and organizing collections of documents. His use of materials was marked by a quite outstanding scrupulosity with regard to matters of fact. Whatever industriousness and commonsensical perceptiveness could wring from often inadequate, often intransigent sources, Kuykendall set himself to extract. Though the Historical Commission itself did not survive the Great Depression, Kuykendall, continuing his researches as a faculty member of the University o...

This volume is one of the fruits of a project undertaken more than a dozen years ago by the Historical Commission of the Territory of Hawaii and carried on since 1932 by the University of Hawaii. The project called for the preparation of a comprehensive general history of Hawaii based upon a thorough study of original sources. The first phase of the undertaking was to discover the source material not already available in Honolulu and to obtain copies of as much of it as possible, particularly of documents which shed new light on the history of the islands. For this purpose, extensive research has been carried on in the national archives of the United States, Great Britain, and France, and minor investigations have been made in the archives of Belgium and Mexico and in a number of libraries and collections in the United States. Many thousand pages of transcripts have been obtained from these places, supplementing at many points and in many important respects the materials previously available in Honolulu. Independently of this project, a large quantity of new material has been added to collections in the Territory, and there has...

Preface. xi -- List of Abbreviations. xiii -- Introduction: A Glimpse of Ancient Hawaii. 1 -- Coming of the Foreigners. 12 -- Kamehameha and the Founding of the Kingdom. 29 -- 1819. 61 -- Kamehameha II. 71 -- Early Commercial Development. 82 -- New Religion and New Learning. 100 -- The Early Years of the Reign of Kamehameha III: Regency of Kaahumanu. 117 -- The Troubled Thirties. 133 -- The Birth of Constitutional Government. 153 -- Industry, Agriculture, Manufactures. 170 -- The Recognition of Hawaii's Independence. 185 -- The Paulet Episode. 206 -- Governmental Reorganization in the Midst of Difficulties. 227 -- The Land Revolution. 269 -- Commercial and Agricultural Progress, 1830-1854. 299 -- Religious and Educational Development, 1840-1854. 335 -- The Struggle for Equitable Treaties. 368 -- The Shadow of Destiny. 383 -- On the Date of the Birth of Kamehameha. 429 -- On the Regency, 1823-1833. 430 -- On the Origin of the Hawaiian Sandalwood Trade. 434 -- On the Debt Settlement of 1826. 434 -- Index. 437 --...

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The World Factbook: 1987

By: Central Intelligence Agency

There have been some significant changes in this edition. A new Geography section has replaced the former Land and Water sections. Entries in the new section include area (total and land), comparative area, land boundaries, coastline, maritime claims, boundary disputes, climate, terrain, land use, environment, and special notes. In the Government section, a new entry on dependent areas has also been added....

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Propuesta de un protocolo para la ejecución de autopsia psicológica empleando sociometría conductual: Proposal of a protocol for the implementation of psychological autopsy using sociometry behavioral

By: Jacobo Herrera Rodríguez, Dr.; Aurelio Israel Coronado Mares, Dr.

Se realiza en este documento una propuesta metodológica para la ejecución siguiendo un protocolo, de la técnica de autopsia psicológica empleando técnicas pertenecientes a la sociometría conductual. Dentro de este artículo, inicialmente se hace una revisión histórica-conceptual de la técnica de autopsia psicológica, para ubicar sus alcances, así como para delimitar su campo de aplicación y utilidades. Enseguida se exponen algunas cuestiones fundamentales de la sociometría conductual. Finalmente se describe el diseño metodológico propuesto, pretendiendo que esta propuesta sea útil para el trabajo de esclarecimiento de casos suicidas y criminales, así como un apoyo para la labor investigativa policial y la conformación de bases de datos de tipo epidemiológico. Se describe además, el proceso de piloteo que se empleó en este protocolo en particular....

It is carried out in this document a methodological proposal for the execution using a protocol of the psychological autopsy technique applying social-behavioral and social-cognitive maps. This article initially shows a historic-conceptual review of the technique of psychological autopsy in order to locate its reaches, as well as for delimit its field of application and utilities. After that the article exposes some sociometrics behavioral basics. Finally the proposed methodological design is described. The design looks to be useful for the clarification work in suicide and criminal cases and can also help the police work and the configure of epidemiological data base. The test process that was employed in this protocol is described in the text....

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Reservation for Other Backward Classes in Indian Central Government Institutions Like IITs, IIMs, and AIIMS - A Study of the Role of Media Using Fuzzy Super FRM Models

By: Florentin Smarandache; W. B. Vasantha Kandasamy

This book has four chapters. In chapter one the authors introduce the three types of super FRM models. Chapter two uses these three new super fuzzy models to study the role of media which feverishly argued against 27 percent reservation for OBCs in Central Government-run institutions in India. The experts we consulted were divided into 19 groups depending on their profession. These groups of experts gave their opinion and comments on the news-items that appeared about reservations in dailies and weekly magazines, and the gist of these lengthy discussions form the third chapter of this book. The fourth chapter gives the conclusions based on our study....

Dedication 5 Preface 6 Chapter One INTRODUCTION TO NEW SUPER FUZZY MODELS 7 1.1 Supermatrices and Fuzzy Supermatrices 7 1.2 Super Fuzzy Relational Maps 45 Chapter Two ANALYSIS OF THE ROLE OF MEDIA ON RESERVATION FOR OBC USING SUPER FUZZY MODELS 57 2.1 Brief Description of the Attributes Given by the Experts 58 2.2 Super Row FRM Model to Study the Role of Media on OBC Reservation 77 2.3 Super Fuzzy Mixed FRM Model to Study the Role of Media in Falsely Blaming the Government and Supporting Dr. Venugopal 88 2.4 Use of Super Column FRM Model to Study the Interrelation between the Government and Public 102 2.5 Analysis of Role of Media on Reservation for OBC using Fuzzy Cognitive Map 117 2.6 Observations based on this Analysis by Students and Experts through Seminars and Discussions 121 Chapter Three EXCERPT OF NEWS FROM PRINT MEDIA AND SUGGESTIONS AND COMMENTS BY THE EXPERTS 145 Chapter Four ANALYSIS SUGGESTIONS AND CONCLUSIONS BASED ON DISCUSSIONS, QUESTIONNAIRE, INTERVIEWS AND MATHEMATICAL MODELS 357 4.1 A View and Analysis by Group of Educationalists about Role of Media on OBC Reservation 357 4.1.1 Students Pro...

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The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin with Introduction and Notes Edited

By: Charles W. Eliot

Introduction: Benjamin Franklin was born in Milk Street, Boston, on January 6, 1706. His father, Josiah Franklin, was a tallow chandler who married twice, and of his seventeen children Benjamin was the youngest son. His schooling ended at ten, and at twelve he was bound apprentice to his brother James, a printer, who published the ?New England Courant.? To this journal he became a contributor, and later was for a time its nominal editor....

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Mathematical Analysis of the Problems faced by the People with Disabilities (PWDs) : With Specific Reference to Tamil Nadu (India)

By: Florentin Smarandache; W. B. Vasantha Kandasamy

The authors in this book have analyzed the socio-economic and psychological problems faced by People with Disabilities (PWDs) and their families. The study was made by collecting data using both fuzzy linguistic questionnaire by interviews in case they are not literates from 2,15,811 lakhs people. This data was collected using the five Non Government Organizations (NGOs) from northern Tamil Nadu....

The main objective of this was to understand the basic psychological and social problems faced by the PWDs and their caretakers. To interpret the collected data, tabulations and analysis were made. Efforts were made to highlight the inferences in each table and in few places comments were made in order to use it for fuzzy analysis. Following is the list of organizations and the total population from 5 blocks is listed below....

Preface 6 Chapter One INTRODUCTION TO BASIC CONCEPTS 11 Chapter Two ANALYSIS OF THE COLLECTED DATA OF THE PWDS FROM MELMALAYANUR AND KURINJI PADI BLOCKS IN TAMIL NADU 13 Chapter Three THE NEW FUZZY COGNITIVE RELATIONAL MAPS (FCRMS) BIMODEL 29 Chapter Four ANALYSIS OF THE SOCIO ECONOMIC PROBLEMS FACED BY THE PWDS USING (SFCMS) 47 4.1 Application of FCMs Models to Social and Psychological Problems 48 4.2 Expert Opinion of PWDs using Special FCMs to Analyse the Problem of PWDs 50 4.3 The Expert Opinion of the caretakers of the PWDs using SFCM 59 4.4 The Expert Opinion of the NGOs working with the PWDs using Special FCM Model 62 Chapter Five THE STUDY OF INTERRELATED PROBLEMS FACED BY THE PWDS AND THE CARE TAKERS 73 5.1 Introduction 73 5.2 Experts Opinion from a Public Person Living in Melmalayanur Block 77 5.3 Expert Opinion of PWDs using FRMs 84 5.4 Expert Opinion of Caretakers of the PWDs using FRM 87 5.5 Expert Opinion of the NGOs working with the PWDs using the FRM model 93 Chapter Six ANALYSIS OF PROBLEMS OF RURAL PWDs USING THE NEW FCRM BIMODEL 99 6.1 Expert Opinion of the Caretaker and a PWD using the ...

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Mauna Kea

By: Kepa Maly

At the request of Stephanie Nagata, on behalf of the University of Hawaii-Office of Mauna Kea Management, Kumu Pono Associates LLC undertook research, compiled a detailed collection of archival-historical records, and conducted oral history interviews with kupuna and elder kamaaina, pertaining to the ahupuaa (native land divisions) of Kaohe, Humuula and neighboring aina mauna (mountain lands) of Mauna Kea, on the island of Hawaii. This work was undertaken as a part of on-going archival and oral historical research conducted by Kumu Pono Associates LLC, since 1996, and builds upon the accounts published by Maly in 1997, 1999, 2002, and 2003. The study is multifaceted, and includes detailed verbatim accounts and descriptions of Mauna Kea, the larger Humuula-Kaohe lands, and aina mauna, covering the periods of Hawaiian antiquity and traditions, to first-hand accounts of travel on and around Mauna Kea, dating from the early 1820s to the 1960s. One of the primary goals of this study has been to bring a significant collection of historical resource material, describing—native Hawaiian traditions, traditional and customary practices and b...

As early as the 1820s, introduced cattle, sheep, goats, and wild dogs had made their way up to the mountain lands, and were bothersome to those who traveled the aina mauna. In 1834, Scottish naturalist, David Douglas was killed by a wild bullock at Keahua-ai (now called Douglas Pit or Kaluakauka), near the boundary of Humuula and Laupahoehoe. By 1850, the natural-cultural landscape of the aina mauna was being significantly altered by the roving herds of wild bullocks, sheep and other ungulates, and ranching interests were being formalized in the region. In 1857, the Crown and Government mountain lands of Humuula and Kaohe—including the summit of Mauna Kea—were leased to Francis Spencer and the Waimea Grazing and Agricultural Company, which established ranching stations and operations around the mountain lands. Portions of the land of Piihonua were leased to native bird hunters in the middle 1860s, and subsequently to native and foreign bullock hunters. As a result, Humuula and the larger aina mauna have been intensively ranched for more than 150 years....

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Mapping the Lands and Waters of Hawai'I

By: Riley M. Moffat

In i870, the kingdom of hawaii faced a challenge: as a result of often poor surveying during the mahele process in the 1840s and 1850s, land records were chaotic. Uncertainty over boundaries and land ownership was a major hindrance to real estate sales, taxes, and the development of the kingdoms economy. Under the direction of the young William DeWitt Alexander, a new government agency was established to take charge of surveying and mapping operations in the country. The Hawaiian Government Survey (1870—1900) was an ambitious undertaking for the period. Although comparable agencies were well established in Europe by then, even the United States had not yet created an agency whose mandate was to map the entire country. Combining the best of a classical education, a pragmatic approach to problems, and a willingness to tackle rugged outdoor work in often miserable conditions, W. D. Alexander succeeded in shaping his small but dedicated staff into a mapping agency that achieved a remarkably high standard of proficiency. In doing so, Alexander made a decision that was both brave and wise, choosing not to emulate the work of European and ...

By the late 1860s, private land ownership had replaced the traditional Hawaiian land tenure system, with profound and far-reaching effects on Hawaiian society. In the traditional Hawaiian system land was not owned outright by anyone but was held in stewardship for all the people by the alii ai moku, the highest ranking member of society. The alii ai moku granted the use of specific pieces of land to high-ranking alii (often referred to as chiefs), who in turn assigned parcels to be used by lesser alii or to individual families. The makaainana, or common people, paid rent to those above them in the hierarchy by giving a portion of the produce from their gardens and other resources gathered from the land and the waters and by contributing labor to projects for the common good. Recipients of such benefits kept some and passed the rest up the social and political chain. The alii in turn were obligated to carry out the many functions associated with any form of government....

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Gerrard Street Mystery and Other Weird Tales, The

By: John Charles Dent

John Charles Dent, the author of the following remarkable stories, was born in Kendal, Westmorland, England, in 1841. His parents emigrated to Canada shortly after that event, bringing with them, of course, the youth who was afterwards to become the Canadian author and historian. Mr. Dent received his primary education in Canadian schools, and afterwards studied law, becoming in due course a member of the Upper Canada Bar. He only practised for a few years, then returned to England to pursue a literary career, writing mostly for periodicals. After remaining in England for several years, Mr. Dent and his family moved to Boston, in America, for about two years. But he finally returned to Canada, accepting a journalistic position in Toronto. Mr. Dent proceeded to write 'The Canadian Portrait Gallery', which ran to four large volumes, 'The Last Forty Years: Canada since the Union of 1841', and a 'History of the Rebellion in Upper Canada'. This collected work of his short fiction, contributed by their author at considerable intervals to different periodicals, was published posthumously. The stories themselves are delightfully anchored in...

Horror/Ghost stories, Mystery, Short stories

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Combinatorial Geometry with Applications to Field Theory : Second Edition

By: Linfan Mao

In The 2nd Conference on Combinatorics and Graph Theory of China (Aug. 16-19, 2006, Tianjing), I formally presented a combinatorial conjecture on mathematical sciences (abbreviated to CC Conjecture), i.e., a mathematical science can be reconstructed from or made by combinatorialization, implicated in the foreword of Chapter 5 of my book Automorphism groups of Maps, Surfaces and Smarandache Geometries (USA, 2005). This conjecture is essentially a philosophic notion for developing mathematical sciences of 21st century, which means that we can combine different fields into a union one and then determines its behavior quantitatively. It is this notion that urges me to research mathematics and physics by combinatorics, i.e., mathematical combinatorics beginning in 2004 when I was a post-doctor of Chinese Academy of Mathematics and System Science. It finally brought about me one self-contained book, the first edition of this book, published by InfoQuest Publisher in 2009. This edition is a revisited edition, also includes the development of a few topics discussed in the first edition....

1.5 ENUMERATION TECHNIQUES 1.5.1 Enumeration Principle. The enumeration problem on a finite set is to count and find closed formula for elements in this set. A fundamental principle for solving this problem in general is on account of the enumeration principle: For finite sets X and Y , the equality |X| = |Y | holds if and only if there is a bijection f : X → Y . Certainly, if the set Y can be easily countable, then we can find a closed formula for elements in X....

Contents Preface to the Second Edition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i Chapter 1. Combinatorial Principle with Graphs . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.1 Multi-sets with operations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 1.1.1 Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.1.2 Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1.1.3 Boolean algebra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 1.1.4 Multi-Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 1.2 Multi-posets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 1.2.1 Partially ordered set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 1.2.2 Multi-Poset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 1.3 Countable sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 1.3.1 Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 1.3.2 Countable set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 1.4 Graphs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 1.4.1 Graph. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 1.4.2 Subgraph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 1.4.3 Labeled graph. . . . . . ...

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The Art of Anti-War

By: Florentin Smarandache

The antiwar of our entire nation is defined as being the army-impeded forces, skirmishing shoulder to shoulder with the civilian population, with the purpose of defeating all non-aggressors, for securing our country’s slavery and dependency. The defeat in this battle is assured through a moral inferiority of our population - the right cause of this antiwar -, the lack of heroism of our state’s citizens, by applying an adequate blundering, using our geographical disadvantages, and the international public humiliation. ...

The battle and its non-goal. The battle is an ensemble of skirmishes of the subunits and units, which take place in a disorganized manner using armament and fighting techniques, for the expressed desire to enforce the enemy. The battle cannot take place on the ground, in the air, or on the water, in an open paradoxist cooperation with all-military denominations, and using their armament’s procedures with the goal of empowering the non-aggressor enemy. The battle is not the only way for obtaining the miscarriage. The battle’s goal is not the destruction or the capture of enemy’s groups, or the capture and holding on of critical portions of terrain. While in anti-defense, the defeat with fewer forces of the enemy’s superior forces would be done with our old-fashioned technique: ...

Instruction Notebooks...............................3 Table of Contents .................................4 1 The Non-Tactical Instruction...........................10 Non-Assignment 1. ...............................10 The battle and its non-goal. ...........................12 The principles of non-organizing the battle’s actions. .................13 Non-Assignment 2...............................13 The disorganization principle of the subunits of unpatriotic guards. ............15 The subunits of the other branches of the military, their non-role, and their non-missions. ....15 The non-role and non-missions unsustainable by the other branches of the military. ......16 Not understanding the modern military ......................17 General principles disregarding the non-actions conducted by the subunits of a non-modern military in the inoffensive battles............................18 The anti-defense forms............................20 The non-roles and the non-missions of the fight units. .................20 The non-insurance for battle...........................20 The content of the battle’s non-insurance, its goal...

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Smallholder Dairying in the Tropics

By: Lindsay Falvey & Charan Chantalakhana

Total consumption of milk in developing regions is projected to increase from 164 million metric tonnes in 1993 to 391 million metric tons by the year 2020 – a 138 percent increase! The expected increase in per capita consumption is from 38 to 62 kg/person. The triple effects of population increase, income growth and urbanisation will fuel this tremendous growth in demand. Milk provides quality protein and essential micronutrients needed for nutrient balance in marginal diets based on staple grain and root crops. The production of more milk in developing countries will help meet the needs of urban families at prices they can afford. With affordable prices, poor families, especially children, are more likely to consume the quality protein and essential micronutrients they need for healthy physical and mental development. Increasing dairy production is a major challenge for those engaged in international livestock development. Moreover, there are environmental concerns about livestock production in fragile landscapes, so increasing milk supply should be done in an environmentally sustainable manner. Research can help meet this c...

Table of Contents About the Authors Acknowledgements Foreward Chapter 1: The dairy industry in a changing world H. Schelhaas Introduction Four specific features of the dairy industry Milk production The processing industry in Western countries Dairy policy Consumption of dairy products in Western countries The international dairy markets Conclusions Suggested reading Chapter 2: Dairy production systems in the tropics P. N. de Leeuw, A. Omore, S. Staal and W. Thorpe Global overview of tropical dairy production Sub-Saharan Africa Asia Central and South America Dairy production systems in sub-Saharan Africa Dairy production systems in Asia Dairy production systems in Latin America Dual-purpose systems Intensive milk production Conclusions References Chapter 3: Socio-economic aspects of smallholder dairy farmers A. J. De Boer Introduction Smallholder dairy farming systems Types of systems Post-milking considerations Technological change and technology transfer for smallholder dairying Background Methods On-farm trials Change, dynamics and opportunities Impact of economic liberalisa...

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Atlas of Hawai'I

By: Department of Geography, University of Hawaii at Hilo

The long-awaited third edition of the Atlas of Hawai'i is entirely revised in content and design. It is divided into six sections, five of which are abundantly illustrated. The first contains detailed reference maps with place names for towns, mountains, bays, harbors, and other features; geographical descriptions of the state and the main islands; and an introduction to Hawaiian place names. This is followed by four sections on the physical, biotic, cultural, and social aspects of the Hawai'i environment. Geology, climate, the ocean, water, soils, and astronomy are among the topics discussed in "The Physical Environment." Next the special character of terrestrial and marine ecosystems is described in "The Biotic Environment." "The Cultural Environment" considers the people of Hawai'i. The diversity of the state's cultures is treated in chapters on history and languages as well as archaeology, religion, and the arts. "The Social Environment" treats such elements as the economy, government, and tourism. The sixth and final section comprises a statistical supplement, bibliography, and gazetteer for the reference maps. Readers of th...

Eo e ku'u lei mokupuni o na kai 'ewalu- I call to you, acknowledge O my lei islands of the eight seas. Located between 19 and 22 degrees north latitude, Hawai'i is the southernmost state in the United States and has the same general latitude as Hong Kong and Mexico City. It is situated almost in the center of the Pacific Ocean and is one of the most isolated yet populous places on Earth. The west coast of North America, for example, is 2,400 miles (3,900 kilometers) from Honolulu, and Japan is 3,800 miles (6,100 kilometers) away. Six time zones separate Hawai'i from the eastern United States. This means that 9:00 A.M. (eastern standard time) in Washington, D.C. and New York City is 6:00 a.m. in Los Angeles and 4:00 a.m. in Hawai'i....

Preface -- ix -- Acknowledgments -- xi -- Introduction -- xiii -- Kaua'i and Ni'ihau -- 3 -- O'ahu -- 7 -- Moloka'i and Lana'i -- 11 -- Maui -- 14 -- Hawai'i -- 17 -- Northwestern Hawaiian Islands -- 23 -- Hawaiian Place Names -- 26 -- Mapping and Geodesy -- 29 -- Geology -- 37 -- Geothermal Resources -- 47 -- Climate -- 49 -- Hawai'i and Atmospheric Change -- 60 -- Paleoclimate and Geography -- 64 -- Natural Hazards -- 67 -- Earthquakes -- 69 -- Volcanic Hazards on the Island of Hawai'i -- 72 -- Hurricanes -- 74 -- Tsunamis -- 76 -- Coastal Hazards -- 79 -- The Ocean -- 82 -- Water -- 87 -- Soils -- 92 -- Astronomy -- 97 -- Biogeography -- 103 -- Evolution -- 107 -- Marine Ecosystems -- 111 -- Terrestrial Ecosystems -- 121 -- Birds -- 130 -- Native Plants -- 135 -- Insects and Their Kin -- 140 -- Hawaiian Tree Snails -- 144 -- Alien Species and Threats to Native Ecology -- 146 -- Endangered and Threatened Species -- 150 -- Protected Areas -- 154 -- Archaeology -- 161 -- History -- 169 -- Population -- 183 -- Languages -- 198 -- Religion -- 201 -- Architecture -- 205 -- Museums and Libraries -- 208 -- Culture and the Arts -- 211 --...

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Paradoxist Distiches

By: Florentin Smarandache

The whole paradoxist distich should be as a geometric unitary parabola, hyperbola, ellipse at the borders between art, philosophy, rebus, and mathematics – which exist in complementariness. The School of Paradoxist Literature, which evolved around 1980s, continues through these bi-verses closed in a new lyric exact formula, but with an opening to essence. For this kind of procedural poems one can elaborate mathematical algorithms and implement them in a computer: but, it is preferable a machine with … soul!...

I M M O D E S T With the shame Shamelessness U N D E C I D E D Fighting Himself J A Z Z ( I ) Melodious Anarchy J A Z Z ( I I ) Anarchic Melody...

Fore/word and Back/word _________ 3 The making of the distich : _____ 3 Characteristics: ______________ 3 Historical considerations: _____ 5 Types of Paradoxist distiches ___ 8 1. Clichés paraphrased: ___ 8 2. Parodies: _____________ 8 3. Reversed formulae: ____ 8 4. Double negation _______ 8 5. Double affirmation, ____ 8 6. Turn around on false tracks: _________________ 8 7. Hyperboles (exaggerated): __________________ 8 8. With nuance changeable from the title: ________ 8 9. Epigrammatic: ________ 8 10. Pseudo-paradoxes: ___ 8 11. Tautologies: ________ 9 12. Redundant: _________ 9 13. Based on pleonasms: _ 9 14. or on anti-pleonasms: 9 15. Substitution of the attribute in collocations ___ 9 16. Substitution of the complement in collocations 9 17. Permutation of various parts of the whole: ___ 9 18. The negation of the clichés ______________ 10 19. Antonymization (substantively, adjectively, etc.) ________________ 10 20. Fable against the grain: _________________ 10 21. Change in grammatical category (preserving substitutions’ homonymy): ________________ 10 22. Epistolary or colloquia style: _________...

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