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Kidney Beans

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Kidney Beans

Kidney beans, raw
Red kidney beans
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy 1,393 kJ (333 kcal)
Carbohydrates 60 g
- Sugars 2 g
- Dietary fiber 15 g
Fat 1 g
Protein 24 g
Water 12 g
Pantothenic acid (B5) 0.8 mg (16%)
Folate (vit. B9) 394 μg (99%)
Calcium 143 mg (14%)
Iron 8 mg (62%)
Magnesium 140 mg (39%)
Potassium 1406 mg (30%)
Zinc 3 mg (32%)
Percentages are roughly approximated
using USDA Nutrient Database

The kidney bean is a variety of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris). It is named for its visual resemblance in shape and color to a kidney. Kidney red beans can be confused with other beans that are red, such as azuki beans. In Jamaica, they are called "red peas".

Classification

  • Red kidney bean (also known as: common kidney bean).
  • Light speckled kidney bean (and long shape light speckled kidney bean).
  • Red speckled kidney bean (and long shape light speckled kidney bean).
  • White kidney bean.

The dishes

Red kidney beans are commonly used in chili con carne and are an integral part of the cuisine in northern regions of India, where the beans are known as rajma and are used in a dish of the same name. Red kidney beans are used in New Orleans and much of southern Louisiana for the classic Monday Creole dish of red beans and rice. The smaller, darker red beans are also used, particularly in Louisiana families with a recent Caribbean heritage. Small kidney beans used in La Rioja, Spain, are called caparrones.

Note

Kidney beans are more toxic than most other bean varieties if not pre-soaked and subsequently heated to the boiling point for at least 10 minutes (see Phaseolus vulgaris#Toxicity).

References

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