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Minors detained in the global war on terror

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Title: Minors detained in the global war on terror  
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Subject: Opposition to the War in Afghanistan (2001–present), Hassan bin Attash, Guantanamo Bay detention camp, Abd al Razaq Abdallah Hamid Ibrahim al Sharikh
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Minors detained in the global war on terror

Juveniles held at the Guantanamo Bay detention camp numbered fifteen, according to a 2011 study by the University of California Davis.[1] The U.S. State Department had publicly acknowledged twelve.[2] The US Department of Defense defined minors at Guantanamo as those below the age of 16, whereas they are defined as below the age of 18 in international law. Three juveniles aged below 16 were held in Camp Iguana, but others between 16 and 18 were put into the general population and treated as adults. These included Omar Khadr, a Canadian citizen who was 15 when captured and one of the youngest detainees, 16 when transported to Guantanamo.

May 2008 report to the United Nations

On May 15, 2008 the American Civil Liberties Union published a report that the Bush Presidency had submitted to the United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child.[3] The report stated that the USA had apprehended 2500 juveniles—2400 of them in Iraq. It said that a total of ten juveniles had been held in the Bagram Theater Detention Facility in Afghanistan and that eight juveniles had been held in the Guantanamo Bay detention camps.[4][5][6][7]

List of known juveniles held at the Guantanamo Bay detention camps

Department of Defense documents acknowledge that at least fifteen children were at one time imprisoned at Guantanamo:[2]

Name ISN Date of birth Transferred to Guantanamo Age in years at transfer
Mohammed Ismail 930 -- -- 88 07 Feb 02 13 - 14
Assad Ullah 912 -- -- 88 -- Dec 02 13 - 14
Naqib Ullah 913 -- -- 88 -- Jan 03 14 - 15
Mohammed el Gharani 269 -- -- 86 09 Feb 02 15 - 16
Mohammed Omar 540 -- -- 86 11 Jun 02 15 - 16
Shams Ullah 783 -- -- 86 27 Oct 02 15 - 16
Omar Ahmed Khadr 766 19 Sep 86 27 Oct 02 16
Yussef Mohammed Mubarak al Shihri 114 08 Sep 85 16 Jan 02 16
Abdul Samad 911 -- -- 86 06 Feb 03 16 - 17
Abdul Qudus 929 -- -- 86 07 Feb 03 16 - 17
Ibrahim Umar al Umar 585 -- -- 85 15 Jun 02 16 - 17
Abdul Salam Ghetan (al Shehri) 132 14 Dec 84 20 Jan 02 17
Yasser Talal Al Zahrani 093 22 Sep 84 20 Jan 02 17
Khalil Rahman Hafez (Hafez K. Rahman) 301 20 Feb 84 07 Feb 02 17
'Abd al Razaq (Abdullah Razzaq) 067 18 Jan 84 17 Jan 02 17

In addition, the UC Davis report lists six detainees who might have been 17 at the time of transfer to Guantanamo:[2]

Name ISN Date of birth Transferred to Guantanamo Age in years at transfer
Mohamed Jawad 900 -- -- 85 06 Feb 03 17 - 18
Qari Esmhatulla 591 -- -- 84 10 Jun 02 17 - 18
Sajin Urayman 545 -- -- 84 13 Jun 02 17 - 18
Faris Muslim al Ansari 253 -- -- 84 17 Jun 02 17 - 18
Peta Muhammed 908 -- -- 84 05 Aug 02 17 - 18
Mahbub Rahman 1052 -- -- 85 21 Nov 03 17 - 18

See also

Notes

External links

  • WikiLeaks and the 22 Children of Guantánamo Andy Worthington
  • U.S. Has Detained 2,500 Juveniles as Enemy Combatants
  • Guantánamo: pain and distress for thousands of children

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