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Thrason

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Thrason

Thraso (Greek: ΘΡΑΣΟΝΟΣ) was an Indo-Greek king in Central and Western Punjab, unknown until the 1982 discovery of one of his coins by R. C. Senior in the Surana hoard. The coin is in a style similar to those of Menander I, has the same type of Athena, and shares one of Menander's mint marks. On the coin, the title of Thraso is "Basileus Megas" ("Great King"), a title which only Eucratides the Great had dared take before him and which is seemingly misplaced on the young boy Thraso, whose single preserved coin indicates a small and insignificant reign.

Osmund Bopearachchi suggests a preliminary dating of 95–80 BCE, but Senior himself concludes that Thraso was the son and heir of Menander (c. 155–130 BCE), since his coin not worn and found in a hoard with only earlier coins.[1]

It seems as though the child was briefly raised to the throne in the turmoil following the death of Menander, by a general who thought the grandiloquent title might strengthen his case.

Notes

Indo-Greek Ruler
(Punjab)
possibly c. 130 BCE
INDO-GREEK KINGS AND THEIR TERRITORIES
Based on Bopearachchi (1991)
Territories/
Dates
PAROPAMISADE
ARACHOSIA GANDHARA WESTERN PUNJAB EASTERN PUNJAB
200–190 BCE
190–180 BCE 50px
185–170 BCE
180–160 BCE
175–170 BCE
170–145 BCE
160–155 BCE
155–130 BCE
130–120 BCE 50px
120–110 BCE 50px 50px
110–100 BCE
100 BCE 50px
100–95 BCE Philoxenus
95–90 BCE Diomedes
90 BCE 50px Thraso
90–85 BCE
90–70 BCE 50px
Yuezhi tribes Maues (Indo-Scythian)
75–70 BCE
65–55 BCE Dionysios
55–35 BCE Azes I (Indo-Scythian)
55–35 BCE 50px
25 BCE – 10 CE
Rajuvula (Indo-Scythian)

References

RC Senior, The Indo-Greek and Indo-Scythian King Sequences in the Second and First Centuries BC, ONS 179 Supplement

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