Today's FBI

Today's FBI
File:Today's F.B.I. o.jpg
Also known as Today's F.B.I.
Genre Crime drama
Written by Rogers Turrentine
Directed by Harvey S. Laidman
Stan Jolley
Virgil W. Vogel
Starring Mike Connors
Carol Potter
Johnny Seven
Rick Hill
Harold Sylvester
Joseph Cali
Opening theme Elmer Bernstein
Composer(s) Elmer Bernstein
John Cacavas
Charles R. Casey
Country of origin USA
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 1
No. of episodes 18, plus 1 TV-movie
Production
Executive producer(s) David Gerber
Editor(s) Herbert H. Dow
Running time 60 min.
Production companies David Gerber Productions
Columbia Pictures Television
Broadcast
Original channel ABC
Original run October 25, 1981 (1981-10-25) – April 26, 1982 (1982-04-26)
Chronology
Related shows The F.B.I.

Today's FBI is an American crime drama television series, an updated and revamped version of the earlier series The F.B.I.

Like the original program, this series is based on actual cases from the files of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and the F.B.I. was involved in the making of the show. Unlike the original series, which ran for nine seasons, this show ran for only 18 episodes (following a TV-movie pilot) on ABC, during the 1981-1982 season.

Cast

Episode list

Title Original air date
0 "The Bureau" October 25, 1981 (1981-10-25)
TV-movie pilot; 2 hours. 
1 "Hostage" November 1, 1981 (1981-11-01)
A religious leader (David Carradine) takes hostages in a Federal building, demanding that five inmates convicted of murdering members of his family and church be turned over to him — for execution. 
2 "The Charleston Case" November 8, 1981 (1981-11-08)
3 "Terror" November 22, 1981 (1981-11-22)
4 "The Fugitive" November 29, 1981 (1981-11-29)
When three convicts escape from prison, Al learns that one of them is an old friend. Al decides to join the hunt; he starts by talking to his family to find out what went wrong. 
5 "Career Move" December 6, 1981 (1981-12-06)
6 "The El Paso Murders" December 13, 1981 (1981-12-13)
7 "Skyjack" December 27, 1981 (1981-12-27)
8 "Spy" January 10, 1982 (1982-01-10)
9 "A Woman's Story" January 17, 1982 (1982-01-17)
10 "Hit List" January 31, 1982 (1982-01-31)
11 "Deep Cover" February 8, 1982 (1982-02-08)
12 "Serpent in the Garden" February 14, 1982 (1982-02-14)
13 "Blue Collar" February 21, 1982 (1982-02-21)
14 "Surfacing" February 28, 1982 (1982-02-28)
15 "Bank Job" March 7, 1982 (1982-03-07)
16 "Gulf Coast Murders" March 14, 1982 (1982-03-14)
An ex-cop attempts to steal cocaine from the police evidence storeroom. 
17 "Kidnap" April 19, 1982 (1982-04-19)
18 "Tapper" April 26, 1982 (1982-04-26)

Reception

According to Michele Malach of Fort Lewis College, the series attempted a more positive portrayal of the FBI by using diverse characters and a "fallacious assumption that its audience still viewed special agents as 'us' rather than 'them'," in contrast to federal agents with "a rigid, dogmatic, inhumane bureaucracy" depicted in later media, like Point Break, Betrayed, and The X-Files. Viewers "did not buy either the image or [the series]," prompting a cancellation.[1] Richard Gib Powers called it "pointless and a cover-up [of] the FBI villany[.]"[2]

References

External links

  • Internet Movie Database
  • TV.com
  • at epguides.com
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