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VE-cadherin

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Title: VE-cadherin  
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VE-cadherin

Cadherin 5, type 2 (vascular endothelium)
Identifiers
Symbols  ; 7B4; CD144
External IDs GeneCards:
RNA expression pattern
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez
Ensembl
UniProt
RefSeq (mRNA)
RefSeq (protein)
Location (UCSC)
PubMed search

Cadherin 5, type 2 or VE-cadherin (vascular endothelial) also known as CD144 (Cluster of Differentiation 144), is a type of cadherin. It is encoded by the human gene CDH5.[1]

Contents

  • Function 1
  • Interactions 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • Further reading 5
  • External links 6

Function

VE-cadherin is a classical cadherin from the cadherin superfamily and the gene is located in a six-cadherin cluster in a region on the long arm of chromosome 16 that is involved in loss of heterozygosity events in breast and prostate cancer. The encoded protein is a calcium-dependent cell–cell adhesion

This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.

External links

  • Lampugnani MG, Resnati M, Raiteri M et al. (1992). "A novel endothelial-specific membrane protein is a marker of cell-cell contacts". J. Cell Biol. 118 (6): 1511–22.  
  • Suzuki S, Sano K, Tanihara H (1991). "Diversity of the cadherin family: evidence for eight new cadherins in nervous tissue". Cell Regul. 2 (4): 261–70.  
  • Breviario F, Caveda L, Corada M et al. (1995). "Functional properties of human vascular endothelial cadherin (7B4/cadherin-5), an endothelium-specific cadherin". Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol. 15 (8): 1229–39.  
  • Ali J, Liao F, Martens E, Muller WA (1997). "Vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin): cloning and role in endothelial cell-cell adhesion". Microcirculation (New York, N.Y. : 1994) 4 (2): 267–77.  
  • Lampugnani MG, Corada M, Andriopoulou P et al. (1997). "Cell confluence regulates tyrosine phosphorylation of adherens junction components in endothelial cells". J. Cell. Sci. 110 (17): 2065–77.  
  • Lewalle JM, Bajou K, Desreux J et al. (1998). "Alteration of interendothelial adherens junctions following tumor cell-endothelial cell interaction in vitro". Exp. Cell Res. 237 (2): 347–56.  
  • Kremmidiotis G, Baker E, Crawford J et al. (1998). "Localization of human cadherin genes to chromosome regions exhibiting cancer-related loss of heterozygosity". Genomics 49 (3): 467–71.  
  • Kowalczyk AP, Navarro P, Dejana E et al. (1998). "VE-cadherin and desmoplakin are assembled into dermal microvascular endothelial intercellular junctions: a pivotal role for plakoglobin in the recruitment of desmoplakin to intercellular junctions". J. Cell. Sci. 111 (20): 3045–57.  
  • Kawashima M, Kitagawa M (1999). "An immunohistochemical study of cadherin 5 (VE-cadherin) in vascular endothelial cells in placentas with gestosis". J. Obstet. Gynaecol. Res. 24 (6): 375–84.  
  • Carmeliet P, Lampugnani MG, Moons L et al. (1999). "Targeted deficiency or cytosolic truncation of the VE-cadherin gene in mice impairs VEGF-mediated endothelial survival and angiogenesis". Cell 98 (2): 147–57.  
  • Ukropec JA, Hollinger MK, Salva SM, Woolkalis MJ (2000). "SHP2 association with VE-cadherin complexes in human endothelial cells is regulated by thrombin". J. Biol. Chem. 275 (8): 5983–6.  
  • Shimoyama Y, Tsujimoto G, Kitajima M, Natori M (2001). "Identification of three human type-II classic cadherins and frequent heterophilic interactions between different subclasses of type-II classic cadherins". Biochem. J. 349 (Pt 1): 159–67.  
  • Shaw SK, Bamba PS, Perkins BN, Luscinskas FW (2001). "Real-time imaging of vascular endothelial-cadherin during leukocyte transmigration across endothelium". J. Immunol. 167 (4): 2323–30.  
  • van Buul JD, Voermans C, van den Berg V et al. (2002). "Migration of human hematopoietic progenitor cells across bone marrow endothelium is regulated by vascular endothelial cadherin". J. Immunol. 168 (2): 588–96.  
  • Ferber A, Yaen C, Sarmiento E, Martinez J (2002). "An octapeptide in the juxtamembrane domain of VE-cadherin is important for p120ctn binding and cell proliferation". Exp. Cell Res. 274 (1): 35–44.  
  • Gorlatov S, Medved L (2002). "Interaction of fibrin(ogen) with the endothelial cell receptor VE-cadherin: mapping of the receptor-binding site in the NH2-terminal portions of the fibrin beta chains". Biochemistry 41 (12): 4107–16.  
  • Di Simone N, Castellani R, Caliandro D, Caruso A (2003). "Antiphospholid antibodies regulate the expression of trophoblast cell adhesion molecules". Fertil. Steril. 77 (4): 805–11.  
  • Zanetti A, Lampugnani MG, Balconi G et al. (2002). "Vascular endothelial growth factor induces SHC association with vascular endothelial cadherin: a potential feedback mechanism to control vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 signaling". Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol. 22 (4): 617–22.  
  • Lampugnani MG, Zanetti A, Breviario F et al. (2002). "VE-cadherin regulates endothelial actin activating Rac and increasing membrane association of Tiam". Mol. Biol. Cell 13 (4): 1175–89.  
  • Vincent PA, Xiao K, Buckley KM, Kowalczyk AP (2004). "VE-cadherin: adhesion at arm's length". Am J Physiol Cell Physiol. 286 (5): C987–97.  

Further reading

  1. ^ Suzuki S, Sano K, Tanihara H (April 1991). "Diversity of the cadherin family: evidence for eight new cadherins in nervous tissue". Cell Regul. 2 (4): 261–70.  
  2. ^ "Entrez Gene: CDH5 cadherin 5, type 2, VE-cadherin (vascular epithelium)". 
  3. ^ Corada M, Liao F, Lindgren M, Lampugnani MG, Breviario F, Frank R, Muller WA, Hicklin DJ, Bohlen P, Dejana E (March 2001). "Monoclonal antibodies directed to different regions of vascular endothelial cadherin extracellular domain affect adhesion and clustering of the protein and modulate endothelial permeability". Blood 97 (6): 1679–84.  
  4. ^ Corada M, Zanetta L, Orsenigo F, Breviario F, Lampugnani MG, Bernasconi S, Liao F, Hicklin DJ, Bohlen P, Dejana E (August 2002). "A monoclonal antibody to vascular endothelial-cadherin inhibits tumor angiogenesis without side effects on endothelial permeability". Blood 100 (3): 905–11.  
  5. ^ Carmeliet P, Lampugnani MG, Moons L, Breviario F, Compernolle V, Bono F, Balconi G, Spagnuolo R, Oosthuyse B, Dewerchin M, Zanetti A, Angellilo A, Mattot V, Nuyens D, Lutgens E, Clotman F, de Ruiter MC, Gittenberger-de Groot A, Poelmann R, Lupu F, Herbert JM, Collen D, Dejana E (July 1999). "Targeted deficiency or cytosolic truncation of the VE-cadherin gene in mice impairs VEGF-mediated endothelial survival and angiogenesis". Cell 98 (2): 147–57.  
  6. ^ Gory-Fauré S, Prandini MH, Pointu H, Roullot V, Pignot-Paintrand I, Vernet M, Huber P (May 1999). "Role of vascular endothelial-cadherin in vascular morphogenesis". Development 126 (10): 2093–102.  
  7. ^ Crosby CV, Fleming PA, Argraves WS, Corada M, Zanetta L, Dejana E, Drake CJ (April 2005). "VE-cadherin is not required for the formation of nascent blood vessels but acts to prevent their disassembly". Blood 105 (7): 2771–6.  
  8. ^ a b c Lewalle, J M; Bajou K; Desreux J; Mareel M; Dejana E; Noël A; Foidart J M (Dec 1997). "Alteration of interendothelial adherens junctions following tumor cell-endothelial cell interaction in vitro". Exp. Cell Res. (UNITED STATES) 237 (2): 347–56.  
  9. ^ a b c Shasby, D Michael; Ries Dana R; Shasby Sandra S; Winter Michael C (Jun 2002). "Histamine stimulates phosphorylation of adherens junction proteins and alters their link to vimentin". Am. J. Physiol. Lung Cell Mol. Physiol. (United States) 282 (6): L1330–8.  
  10. ^ Nawroth, Roman; Poell Gregor; Ranft Alexander; Kloep Stephan; Samulowitz Ulrike; Fachinger Gregor; Golding Matthew; Shima David T; Deutsch Urban; Vestweber Dietmar (Sep 2002). "VE-PTP and VE-cadherin ectodomains interact to facilitate regulation of phosphorylation and cell contacts". EMBO J. (England) 21 (18): 4885–95.  
  11. ^ Ferber, Andres; Yaen Christopher; Sarmiento Edna; Martinez Jose (Mar 2002). "An octapeptide in the juxtamembrane domain of VE-cadherin is important for p120ctn binding and cell proliferation". Exp. Cell Res. (United States) 274 (1): 35–44.  
  12. ^ Lampugnani, M G; Corada M; Andriopoulou P; Esser S; Risau W; Dejana E (Sep 1997). "Cell confluence regulates tyrosine phosphorylation of adherens junction components in endothelial cells". J. Cell. Sci. (ENGLAND) 110 (17): 2065–77.  
  13. ^ Sui XF, Kiser TD, Hyun SW, Angelini DJ, Del Vecchio RL, Young BA et al. (2005). "Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase micro regulates the paracellular pathway in human lung microvascular endothelia.". Am J Pathol 166 (4): 1247–58.  
  14. ^ Besco JA, Hooft van Huijsduijnen R, Frostholm A, Rotter A (2006). "Intracellular substrates of brain-enriched receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase rho (RPTPrho/PTPRT).". Brain Res 1116 (1): 50–7.  

References

See also

VE-cadherin has been shown to interact with:

Interactions

VE-cadherin is indispensable for proper vascular development – there have been two transgenic mouse models of VE-cadherin deficiency, both embryonic lethal due to vascular defects.[5][6] Further studies using one of these models revealed that although vasculogenesis occurred, nascent vessels collapsed or disassembled in the absence of VE-cadherin.[7] Therefore it was concluded that VE-cadherin serves the purpose of maintaining newly formed vessels.

Integrity of intercellular junctions is a major determinant of permeability of the endothelium, and the VE-cadherin-based adherens junction is thought to be particularly important. VE-cadherin is known to be required for maintaining a restrictive endothelial barrier – early studies using blocking antibodies to VE-cadherin increased monolayer permeability in cultured cells[3] and resulted in interstitial edema and hemorrhage in vivo.[4]

[2]

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