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Yugoslav Cup

Yugoslav Cup
Founded 1923 (1923)
Abolished 1992 (1992)
Region Yugoslavia
Last champions FK Partizan
Most successful club(s) Red Star Belgrade

The Yugoslav Cup (Serbian: Куп Југославије; Croatian: Kup Jugoslavije; Slovene: Pokal Jugoslavije, Macedonian: Куп на Југославија), officially known between 1923 and 1940 as the King Alexander Cup (Serbo-Croatian: Куп Краља Александра / Kup Kralja Aleksandra),[1] and between 1947 and 1991 as the Marshal Tito Cup (Serbian: Куп маршала Тита / Kup maršala Tita; Croatian: Kup maršala Tita; Slovene: Pokal maršala Tita; Macedonian: Куп на маршал Тито), was one of two major football competitions in the former Yugoslavia, the other one being the Yugoslav League Championship. The Yugoslav Cup took place after the league championships when every competitive league in Yugoslavia had finished, in order to determine which teams are ranked as their corresponding seeds. The Marshal Tito Cup trophy was based on a design by Branko Šotra.

Contents

  • Kingdom of Yugoslavia (1923–1940) 1
    • List of winners 1.1
  • SFR Yugoslavia (1947–92) 2
    • Competition format 2.1
    • Key 2.2
    • List of winners 2.3
    • Results by team 2.4
    • Performance by Republic/Province 2.5
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Kingdom of Yugoslavia (1923–1940)

The pre-WW II competition in the then Kingdom of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs (renamed Kingdom of Yugoslavia at the end of 1929) was held irregularly, and sometimes involved only regional selections, sometimes only clubs, and occasionally both clubs and regions. Between 1924 and 1927 the competition consisted of squads from the regional subassociations.[2] Only the players with citizenship of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes were eligible.[1]

List of winners

Season Winner Score Runners–up
1923 HAŠK Zagreb
1924 Zagreb XI 3–2 Split XI
1925 Zagreb XI 3–1 Split XI
1926 Zagreb XI 3–1 Belgrade XI
1927 Belgrade XI 3–0 Subotica XI
1928
1930
1934 BSK Belgrade
1936 SK Jugoslavija
1940 Građanski Zagreb*
  • 1940 Građanski Zagreb title is unverifiable

The winners of the 1928 and 1930 editions are unknown. Split XI, losing finalists in 1924 and 1925, was composed of Hajduk Split players only. After their third successive win in 1926, Zagreb obtained the golden cup of King Aleksandar to keep.

SFR Yugoslavia (1947–92)

Competition format

The competition format was an elimination championship where every competitive team was offered a chance to enter. Beginning in the lowest tiers of teams, the competition followed a one-game elimination format. Higher tier teams got berths in the second round, third round, and so on. The First League (Prva Liga) teams always began in the 1/16 finals, and the rest of the 16 berths being filled by lower tier teams who managed to make it to the round of 32.

Once the round of 16 was reached, the format would be changed to a two-game elimination format, being played at home and away for each team. At this point it became a First League ordeal, as the smaller teams had zero chance against the titans of Yugoslavian football. Historically, the finals were usually reached only by the better-performing First League teams (Partizan, Hajduk, Red Star, Dinamo, etc.).

Key

(R) Replay
Two-legged tie
* Match went to extra time
Match decided by a penalty shoot-out after extra time
Winning team won The Double
Italics Team from outside the top level of Yugoslav football

List of winners

Season Winner Score Runners–up Venue(s) Attendance
1947 Partizan (1) 2–0 Naša Krila Zemun Stadion JNA 10,000
1948 Red Star (1) 3–0 Partizan Stadion Crvena Zvezda 30,000
1949 Red Star (2) 3–2 Naša Krila Zemun Stadion JNA 50,000
1950 Red Star (3)  *1–1 * Dinamo Zagreb Stadion JNA 50,000
1950 (2)(R) Red Star (4) 3–0 Dinamo Zagreb Stadion JNA 45,000
1951 Dinamo Zagreb (1) 4–0 Vojvodina Stadion Maksimir; Stadion JNA 15,000; 20,000
1952 Partizan (2) 6–0 Red Star Stadion JNA 60,000
1953 BSK Belgrade (1) 2–0 Hajduk Split Stadion JNA 50,000
1954 Partizan (3) 4–1 Red Star Stadion JNA 40,000
1955 BSK Belgrade (2) 2–0 Hajduk Split Stadion JNA 20,000
1956–57 Partizan (4) 5–3 Radnički Belgrade Stadion JNA 12,000
1957–58 Red Star (5) 4–0 Velež Mostar Stadion JNA 30,000
1958–59 Red Star (6) 3–1 Partizan Stadion JNA 50,000
1959–60 Dinamo Zagreb (2) 3–2 Partizan Stadion JNA 40,000
1960–61 Vardar (1) 2–1 Varteks Stadion JNA 15,000
1961–62 OFK Belgrade (3) 4–1 Spartak Subotica Stadion JNA 10,000
1962–63 Dinamo Zagreb (3) 4–1 Hajduk Split Stadion JNA 30,000
1963–64 Red Star (7) 3–0 Dinamo Zagreb Stadion Crvena Zvezda 60,000
1964–65 Dinamo Zagreb (4) 2–1 Budućnost Titograd Stadion Crvena Zvezda 13,000
1965–66 OFK Belgrade (4) 6–2 Dinamo Zagreb Stadion JNA 35,000
1966–67 Hajduk Split (1) 2–1 Sarajevo Stadion Stari plac 15,000
1967–68 Red Star (8) 7–0 Bor Stadion Crvena Zvezda 10,000
1968–69 Dinamo Zagreb (5)  *3–3 * Hajduk Split Stadion JNA 20,000
1968–69 (2)(R) Dinamo Zagreb (5) 3–0 Hajduk Split Stadion JNA 15,000
1969–70 Red Star (9)  *3–2 * Olimpija Ljubljana Stadion Bežigrad; Stadion Crvena Zvezda 6,000; 30,000
1970–71 Red Star (10) 6–0 Sloboda Tuzla Stadion Tušanj; Stadion Crvena Zvezda 7,000; 6,000
1971–72 Hajduk Split (2) 2–1 Dinamo Zagreb Stadion JNA 15,000
1973 Hajduk Split (3) 3–2 Red Star Stadion Stari plac; Stadion Crvena Zvezda 25,000; 10,000
1974 Hajduk Split (4) 1–0 Borac Banja Luka Stadion JNA 20,000
1975–76 Hajduk Split (5)  *1–0 * Dinamo Zagreb Stadion Crvena Zvezda 60,000
1976–77 Hajduk Split (6)  *2–0 * Budućnost Titograd Stadion Crvena Zvezda 60,000
1977–78 Rijeka (1)  *1–0 * Trepča Stadion Crvena Zvezda 40,000
1978–79 Rijeka (2) 2–1 Partizan Stadion Kantrida; Stadion Crvena Zvezda 20,000; 55,000
1979–80 Dinamo Zagreb (6) 2–1 Red Star Stadion Maksimir; Stadion Crvena Zvezda 50,000; 50,000
1980–81 Velež Mostar (1) 3–2 Željezničar Sarajevo Stadion Crvena Zvezda 40,000
1981–82 Red Star (11) 6–4 Dinamo Zagreb Stadion Maksimir; Stadion Crvena Zvezda 50,000; 60,000
1982–83 Dinamo Zagreb (7) 3–2 Sarajevo Stadion Crvena Zvezda 25,000
1983–84 Hajduk Split (7) 2–1 Red Star Stadion Poljud; Stadion Crvena Zvezda 12,000; 70,000
1984–85 Red Star (12) 3–2 Dinamo Zagreb Stadion Maksimir; Stadion JNA 40,000; 60,000
1985–86 Velež Mostar (2) 3–1 Dinamo Zagreb Stadion JNA 40,000
1986–87 Hajduk Split (8)  †1–1 Rijeka Stadion JNA 30,000
1987–88 Borac Banja Luka (1) 1–0 Red Star Stadion JNA 25,000
1988–89 Partizan (5) 6–1 Velež Mostar Stadion JNA 35,000
1989–90 Red Star (13) 1–0 Hajduk Split Stadion JNA 35,000
1990–91 Hajduk Split (9) 1–0 Red Star Stadion JNA 7,000
1991–92 Partizan (6) 3–2 Red Star Stadion Crvena Zvezda; Stadion JNA 33,024; 39,370

Results by team

Teams shown in italics are no longer in existence.

Club Republic/Province Winners Last final won Runners-up Last final lost Total apps
Red Star Belgrade Serbia 12 1990 8 1992 20
Hajduk Split Croatia 9 1991 5 1990 14
Dinamo Zagreb Croatia 7 1983 8 1986 15
Partizan Serbia 6 1992 4 1979 10
OFK Belgrade Serbia 4 1966 0 4
Velež Bosnia and Herzegovina 2 1986 2 1989 4
Rijeka Croatia 2 1979 1 1987 3
Borac Banja Luka Bosnia and Herzegovina 1 1988 1 1974 2
Vardar Macedonia 1 1961 0 1
Sarajevo Bosnia and Herzegovina 0 2 1983 2
Budućnost Titograd Montenegro 0 2 1977 2
Naša Krila Zemun Serbia 0 2 1949 2
Željezničar Bosnia and Herzegovina 0 1 1981 1
Trepča Kosovo 0 1 1978 1
Sloboda Tuzla Bosnia and Herzegovina 0 1 1971 1
Olimpija Ljubljana Slovenia 0 1 1970 1
Bor Serbia 0 1 1968 1
Spartak Subotica Vojvodina 0 1 1962 1
Varteks Croatia 0 1 1961 1
Radnički Belgrade Serbia 0 1 1957 1
Vojvodina Vojvodina 0 1 1951 1

Performance by Republic/Province

Republic Winner Runner-Up Appearances
SR Bosnia and Herzegovina 3 7 10
SR Croatia 18 15 33
SAP Kosovo 0 1 1
SR Macedonia 1 0 1
SR Montenegro 0 2 2
SR Slovenia 0 1 1
SR Serbia 22 16 38
SAP Vojvodina 0 2 2

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Yugoslavia/Serbia and Montenegro - Cup Finals at RSSSF
  2. ^ Fudbal u Kraljevini Jugoslaviji, Milorad Sijić, pag. 30

External links

  • Yugoslavia / Serbia and Montenegro Cup finals at RSSSF
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