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1947 In Aviation

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1947 In Aviation

Years in aviation: 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950
Centuries: 19th century · 20th century · 21st century
Decades: 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s
Years: 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950

This is a list of aviation-related events from 1947:

Contents

  • Events 1
    • January 1.1
    • February 1.2
    • March 1.3
    • April 1.4
    • May 1.5
    • June 1.6
    • July 1.7
    • August 1.8
    • September 1.9
    • October 1.10
    • November 1.11
    • December 1.12
  • First flights 2
    • January 2.1
    • February 2.2
    • March 2.3
    • April 2.4
    • May 2.5
    • June 2.6
    • July 2.7
    • August 2.8
    • September 2.9
    • October 2.10
    • November 2.11
    • December 2.12
  • Entered service 3
    • March 3.1
    • April 3.2
    • July 3.3
    • August 3.4
    • October 3.5
    • November 3.6
  • Retired 4
    • March 4.1
  • See also 5
  • References 6

Events

  • The United States‍ '​ inventory of atomic bombs reaches a total of 13 weapons during the year.[1]

January

February

March

  • March 3 – In Naval Strategic Planning Study 3, the Strategic Plans Division of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations asserts that U.S. Navy aircraft carriers will be able to operate successfully against the coast of the Soviet Union in the face of substantial land-based Soviet air power, stating that the carriers are "the only weapon in the possession of the U.S. which can deliver early and effective attacks against Russian air power and selective shore objectives in the initial stages of a Russo-American conflict." The findings anger U.S. Air Force planners, who view strategic attacks against the Soviet Union as a strictly Air Force mission.[8]
  • March 5 – The 26th country ratifies the [9]
  • March 14 – Saudi Arabian Airlines begins regular domestic services.
  • March 16 – Saudi Arabian Airlines begins regular international services.

April

May

June

  • June 17 – Pan American World Airways inaugurates what are considered the world's first scheduled commercial round-the-world flights, although the service actually operates between New York City and San Francisco without crossing the continental United States. Flight One, operated by a Douglas DC-4, departs San Francisco and stops at Honolulu, Hawaii; Midway Atoll; Wake Island; Guam; Manila, the Philippines; Bangkok; and Calcutta, where it meets Flight Two, a Lockheed Constellation that had flown from LaGuardia Airport in New York City. In Calcutta, the two aircraft swap flight deresignations; the DC-4 then turns back and continues as Flight Two to San Francisco, while the Constellation turns back and continues as Flight One, stopping at Karachi; Istanbul; London; Shannon, Ireland; and Gander, Newfoundland before arriving at LaGuardia Airport.
  • June 19
  • June 22 – At the Wilson-King Sky Show in Utah, a light plane involved in the air show experiences brake failure on landing and crashes into cars parked at the edge of the airfield, killing a teenaged girl. The pilot and the dead girl‍ '​s mother and infant sister are injured.[20]
  • June 24 – Kenneth Arnold is piloting a CallAir A-2 at about 9,200 feet (2,804 m) near Mineral, Washington, when he sights what he reports to be a group of disc-like unidentified flying objects flying in a chain which he clocks at a minimum of 1,200 mph (1,932 km/hr). He refers to them as looking like saucers, leading the press to coin the term "flying saucer," which soon enters everyday speech.
  • June 30 – The Evaluation Board for Operation Crossroads submits its final report on the July 1946 atomic bomb tests at Bikini Atoll. It finds that an atomic attack could go beyond stopping a country‍ '​s military effort and in addition wreck its economic and social structure for lengthy periods, and could even depopulate large portions of the earth‍ '​s surface, threaten the existence of civilization, and cause the extinction of mankind. It recommends that the United States develop a large inventory of atomic weapons and the means to deliver them promptly and be prepared to strike first, with legal authority to launch a massive atomic strike to preempt a foreign strike if there are indications that an adversary is preparing one.[3]

July

August

September

October

November

  • November 2 – With Howard Hughes at the controls, the Hughes H-4 Hercules, also known as the "Spruce Goose," makes its first flight, traveling at 135 mph (217 km/hr) for about a mile (1.6 km) at an altitude of 70 feet (21 meters) over Long Beach Harbor in California with 32 people on board. Both the largest flying boat and the aircraft with the largest wingspan (319 feet 11 inches; 97.54 meters) ever built, it never flies again.

December

First flights

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

  • October 1 - North American XP-86, prototype of the [50]
  • October 21 - Northrop YB-49 jet-powered Flying Wing
  • October 24 - Grumman XJR2F-1, prototype of the UF-1, later HU-16, Albatross[51]

November

December

Entered service

March

April

July

August

October

November

Retired

March

See also

References

  1. ^ Ross, Steven T., American War Plans 1945-1950: Strategies For Defeating the Soviet Union, Portland, Oregon: Frank Cass, 1996, ISBN 0-7146-4192-8, p. 12.
  2. ^ Lynch, Adam, "Hometown Heroine," Aviation History, March 2012, p. 58.
  3. ^ a b c d e f Ross, Steven T., American War Plans 1945-1950: Strategies For Defeating the Soviet Union, Portland, Oregon: Frank Cass, 1996, ISBN 0-7146-4192-8, p. 54.
  4. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, with Peter Bowers, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1985, ISBN 978-0-517-56588-9, pp. 21.
  5. ^ TWA History Timeline
  6. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, p. 340.
  7. ^ The AMA History Program Presents: Biography of COL. ROBERT E. THACKER, RET.
  8. ^ Isenberg, Michael T., Shield of the Republic: The United States Navy in an Era of Cold War and Violent Peace, Volume I: 1945-1962, New York: St. Martin's Press, ISBN 0-312-09911-8, p. 131.
  9. ^ a b c icao.int International Civil Aviation Organisation History
  10. ^ a b Aviation Hawaii: 1940-1949 Chronology of Aviation in Hawaii
  11. ^ Sturtivant, Ray, British Naval Aviation: The Fleet Air Arm, 1917-1990, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1990, ISBN 0-87021-026-2, p. 182.
  12. ^ Ross, Steven T., American War Plans 1945-1950: Strategies For Defeating the Soviet Union, Portland, Oregon: Frank Cass, 1996, ISBN 0-7146-4192-8, pp. 36-37, 40.
  13. ^ Aviation Safety Network: Accident Description
  14. ^
  15. ^ Aviation safety Network: Accident Description
  16. ^ Aviation Safety Network: Accident Description
  17. ^ Runway 18 Air Safety, May-June 1947, Chapter 197New York Daily News
  18. ^ Aviation Safety Network: Accident Description
  19. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, p. 274.
  20. ^
  21. ^ Aviation Safety Network: Accident Description
  22. ^ Aviation Safety Network: Accident Description
  23. ^ Isenberg, Michael T., Shield of the Republic: The United States Navy in an Era of Cold War and Violent Peace, Volume I: 1945-1962, New York: St. Martin's Press, ISBN 0-312-09911-8, p. 111.
  24. ^ Sejarah Indonesia: An Online Timeline of Indonesian History: The War for Independence 1945 to 1950
  25. ^ Aviation Safety Network: Accident Description.
  26. ^ Marolda, Edward J., "Asian Warm-Up to the Cold War", Naval History, October 2011, pp. 29-30.
  27. ^ Ross, Steven T., American War Plans 1945-1950: Strategies For Defeating the Soviet Union, Portland, Oregon: Frank Cass, 1996, ISBN 0-7146-4192-8, pp. 41-42.
  28. ^
  29. ^ Aviation Safety Network: Accident Description
  30. ^ Wooldridge, E.T., Captain (ret.), USN, "Snapshots From the First Century of Naval Aviation," Proceedings, September 2011, p. 54.
  31. ^ Aviation Safety Network: Accident Description
  32. ^ Donald, David, ed., The Complete Encyclopedia of World Aircraft, New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 1997, ISBN 978-0-7607-0592-6, p. 84.
  33. ^ Aviation Safety Network: Accident Description
  34. ^ Ross, Steven T., American War Plans 1945-1950: Strategies For Defeating the Soviet Union, Portland, Oregon: Frank Cass, 1996, ISBN 0-7146-4192-8, p. 44.
  35. ^ Isenberg, Michael T., Shield of the Republic: The United States Navy in an Era of Cold War and Violent Peace, Volume I: 1945-1962, New York: St. Martin's Press, ISBN 0-312-09911-8, p. 657.
  36. ^ a b
  37. ^ Aviation Safety Network: Accident Description
  38. ^ Ross, Steven T., American War Plans 1945-1950: Strategies For Defeating the Soviet Union, Portland, Oregon: Frank Cass, 1996, ISBN 0-7146-4192-8, p. 18.
  39. ^ Ross, Steven T., American War Plans 1945-1950: Strategies For Defeating the Soviet Union, Portland, Oregon: Frank Cass, 1996, ISBN 0-7146-4192-8, p. 46.
  40. ^ Donald, David, ed., The Complete Encyclopedia of World Aircraft, New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 1997, ISBN 0-7607-0592-5, p. 115.
  41. ^ Aiation Safety Network: Accident Description.
  42. ^ Ross, Steven T., American War Plans 1945-1950: Strategies For Defeating the Soviet Union, Portland, Oregon: Frank Cass, 1996, 0-7146-4192-8, p. 106.
  43. ^ a b Donald, David, ed., The Complete Encyclopedia of World Aircraft, New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 1997, ISBN 0-7607-0592-5, p. 121.
  44. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, p. 298.
  45. ^ Swanborough, Gordon, and Peter M. Bowers, United States Navy Aircraft Since 1911, London: Putnam, 1976, ISBN 978-0-370-10054-8, p. 467.
  46. ^ Donald, David, ed., The Complete Encyclopedia of World Aircraft, New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 1997, ISBN 978-0-7607-0592-6, p. 272.
  47. ^ Dorr, Robert F., "Mystery Ship Answer," Aviation History, January 2015, p. 10.
  48. ^ Bridgman 1951, p. 8c.
  49. ^ Donald, David, ed., The Complete Encyclopedia of World Aircraft, New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 1997, ISBN 978-0-7607-0592-6, p. 52.
  50. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, ISBN 978-0-517-56588-9, p. 342.
  51. ^ Swanborough, Gordon, and Peter M. Bowers, United States Navy Aircraft Since 1911, London: Putnam, 1976, ISBN 978-0-370-10054-8, p. 229.
  52. ^ Swanborough, Gordon, and Peter M. Bowers, United States Navy Aircraft Since 1911, London: Putnam, 1976, ISBN 978-0-370-10054-8, p. 231.
  53. ^ Polmar, Norman, "Historic Aircraft: The God of the Sea's Namesake", Naval History, October 2011, p. 16.
  54. ^ Dorr, Robert F., "Mystery Ship Answer," Aviation History, July 2012, p. 12.
  55. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, p. 413.
  • Bridgman, Leonard. Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1951–52. London: Sampson Low, Marston & Company, Ltd, 1951.
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