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Area code 203

Connecticut state map with Area codes 203 & 475 in Red

Area code 203 is a North American telephone area code that covers the southwestern part of Connecticut, and is overlaid with area code 475. The area codes stretch from Connecticut's western border, along its southern coast, to Madison, and north to Meriden. (The rest of Connecticut is served by the 860 area code, which will be overlain with 959 at an undisclosed date.) The region encompassed by 203 and 475 roughly corresponds to the Connecticut side of the New York metropolitan area. Prior to August 28, 1995 (when the split with 860 took effect), area code 203 encompassed all of Connecticut.

Counties served by 203/475:[1]

Fairfield (except the Town of Sherman), New Haven, and Litchfield (the towns of Woodbury, Bethlehem, and a small part of Roxbury).

Cities and towns served by 203/475:[1]

Ansonia, Beacon Falls, Bethany, Bethel, Bethlehem, Branford, Bridgeport, Brookfield, Camden, Cheshire, Danbury, Darien, Derby, East Haven, Easton, Fairfield, Greenwich, Guilford, Hamden, Madison, Meriden, Middlebury, Milford, Monroe, Naugatuck, New Canaan, New Fairfield, New Haven, Newtown, North Branford, North Haven, Norwalk, Orange, Oxford, Prospect, Redding, Ridgefield, Roxbury, Seymour, Shelton, Southbury, Stamford, Stratford, Trumbull, Wallingford, Waterbury, West Haven, Weston, Westport, Wilton, Wolcott, Woodbridge, Woodbury


The city of Meriden is notable as the only place in Connecticut where one can call towns in either the Hartford or New Haven exchanges toll-free from a home (landline) phone.

Area code overlay

The area code 860 will be implemented.

The first range of available numbers made available in Connecticut's third area code was (475) 882-4xxx, in the Huntington section of Shelton.

See also

References

External links

  • List of exchanges from AreaCodeDownload.com, 203 Area Code
North: 860, 959
West: 914, 845 area codes 203 and 475 East: 860, 959
South: 516, 631
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