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Craig Roberts Stapleton

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Craig Roberts Stapleton

Craig Roberts Stapleton
61st United States Ambassador to France
In office
2005–2009
President George W. Bush
Barack Obama
Preceded by Howard H. Leach
Succeeded by Charles Rivkin
4th United States Ambassador to the Czech Republic
In office
2001–2004
President George W. Bush
Preceded by John Shattuck
Succeeded by William J. Cabaniss
Personal details
Born 1945 (age 69–70)
Kansas City, Missouri, U.S.
Spouse(s) Dorothy Walker Stapleton
Children 2
Residence Greenwich, Connecticut
Alma mater Harvard University
Occupation Diplomat, Businessman

Craig Roberts Stapleton (born 1945) is a former United States ambassador to France and the Czech Republic.[1][2][3]

Biography

Early life

Craig Stapleton was born in George H.W. Bush.

Career

He served as President of [2] He has served on the board of directors for several companies including Allegheny Properties, Metro PCS, TB Woods and Winston Partners.[2] In July 2009, he became a co-owner of the St. Louis Cardinals.[5]

During the administration of George H.W. Bush, Stapleton sat on the Board of the Bush-Cheney reelection campaign. In June 2005 he was appointed ambassador to France and served until July 2009.[6] He is a member of CERGE-EI Foundation supporting economic education in transition and developing countries.

In 2007 he recommended to the Bush administration that they wage a trade war on European crops, due to European resistance to genetically modified foods such as MON 810, thus denying a key US export.[7]

"Ambassador Stapleton goes on to write, quote, "Country team Paris recommends that we calibrate a target retaliation list that causes some pain across the EU since this is a collective responsibility, but that also focuses in part on the worst culprits. The list should be measured rather than vicious and must be sustainable over the long term, since we should not expect an early victory," he wrote."

Stapleton made an appearance on the Food Network show, The Next Iron Chef in 2007. The final three chefs remaining in the competition each prepared a three-course American-themed dinner for the ambassador and 20 guests. The competition took place in the ambassador's official residence.[8]

Personal life

He and his wife live in Greenwich, Connecticut and have two adult children; his son Walker was elected Colorado State Treasurer in 2010.

References

  1. ^ http://history.state.gov/departmenthistory/people/stapleton-craig-roberts
  2. ^ a b c d "Ambassador Craig Roberts Stapleton". United States Department of State. Archived from the original on 2007-11-30. Retrieved 2009-03-03. 
  3. ^ "Embassy of the United States, Prague". United States Department of State. Retrieved 2011-01-28. 
  4. ^ Sealover, Ed (2009-04-07). "Businessman Stapleton to Run for Colorado Treasurer". Denver Business Journal. Retrieved 2010-07-16. 
  5. ^ "Craig R. Stapleton". Council of American Ambassadors. Retrieved 2010-07-16. 
  6. ^ a b "Craig Robert Stapleton". Office of the Historian, U.S. Department of State. Retrieved 2010-07-16. 
  7. ^ "WikiLeaks: U.S. Wanted Trade War Over GM Crops". CBS News. 2011-01-04. Retrieved 2011-01-04. 
  8. ^ "Lead and Inspire". The Next Iron Chef. Season 1. Episode 5. 2007-11-04.

External links

Media related to at Wikimedia Commons
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
John Shattuck
U.S. Ambassador to the Czech Republic
2001–2004
Succeeded by
William J. Cabaniss
Preceded by
Howard H. Leach
U.S. Ambassador to France
2005–2009
Succeeded by
Charles Rivkin
Preceded by
New office
U.S. Ambassador to Monaco
2006–2009
Succeeded by
Charles Rivkin
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