World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Depository bank

Article Id: WHEBN0002890385
Reproduction Date:

Title: Depository bank  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Banking, Shadow banking system, Global depository receipt, Commercial bank, Credit union
Collection: Banking, Financial Institutions, Legal Entities
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Depository bank

A depository bank (U.S. usage) or depositary bank (predominantly EU usage) is a term used to refer to one or more types of entity which, depending on jurisdiction, facilitiates investment in securities markets.

U.S. Depository Banks

In the depositary receipt program. This function includes arranging for a custodian to accept deposits of ordinary shares, issuing the negotiable receipts which back up the shares, maintaining the register of holders to reflect all transfers and exchanges, and distributing dividends in U.S. dollars.

Depositary Banks in the European Union

In the EU, a depositary is a financial institution which provides fiduciary / custodian services to Investment Funds authorised to trade in any EU jurisdiction as a UCITS or Alternative Investment Fund. Both the UCITS (2009/65/EC) Directive and AIFMD (2011/61/EU) Directives require that authorised investment funds have a depositary appointed to the fund to safekeep the assets of the fund (whether by taking them into custody, or record-keeping and verifying title of them) and oversee the affairs of the fund to ensure that it complies with obligations outlined in relevant laws and the fund’s constitutional documents. Depositaries have been subject to significantly increased regulation in the EU in recent years and the proposed “UCITS V” directive proposes to continue this trend by imposing a standard “strict” standard of depositary liability for the loss of fund assets, other than in certain circumstances.

References

  • See Article 21 of Directive 2011/61/EU - of 8 June 2011 on Alternative Investment Fund Managers and amending Directives 2003/41/EC and 2009/65/EC and Regulations (EC) No 1060/2009 and (EU) No 1095/2010
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.