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Hi-Gen Power

Hi-Gen Power
Industry Alternative energy
Founded 2009 (2009)
Headquarters London, United kingdom
Key people Alisa Murphy (Director)
Services Fuel cell projects development
Website .com.hi-genpowerwww

Hi-Gen Power (former name: B9 Coal) is a London-based developer of projects combining underground coal gasification with carbon capture and storage and alkaline fuel cells. It was established in 2009 to commercialize alkaline fuel cells developed by he fuel cell manufacturer AFC Energy.[1] It is affiliated with B9 Gas.[2]

In 2010, B9 Coal in cooperation with AFC Energy and underground coal gasification developer Linc Energy commissioned a hydrogen fuel cell named Alfa System at the Chinchilla underground coal gasification facility. Combining these technologies allows usage of hydrogen, produced by the underground coal gasification process, as a feedstock for the fuel cell.[3] In August 2010, B9 Coal proposed usage of combined underground coal gasification and alkaline fuel cells technologies at the Rio Tinto Alcan Lynemouth power station in Northumberland.[4][5][5][6] In October 2010, AFC Energy, Powerfuel Power, and B9 Coal agreed to integrate the AFC Energy's fuel cell technology with the integrated gasification combined cycle technology at the planned Hatfield power station at the Hatfield Colliery near Doncaster.[7][8]

References

  1. ^ "Building tomorrow’s power plant today" (PDF). The Energy Industry Times. December 2010. Retrieved 2012-09-29. 
  2. ^ "B9 Coal UCG with fuel cells CCS project". Carbon Capture Journal (17). 2010-10-08. pp. 6–7. Retrieved 2012-09-29. 
  3. ^ "AFC deploys operational alkaline fuel cell with Linc Energy in Australia". Renewable Energy Focus ( 
  4. ^ Harvey, Fiona; Sampson, Luke (2010-08-26). "New Entrant Makes a Push in Carbon Capture".  
  5. ^ a b Kwok W. Wan (2010-08-26). "UK carbon capture competition needs mix - B9 Coal".  
  6. ^ Price, Kelley (2010-08-26). "Teesside bids to be an energy pioneer".  
  7. ^ "UK fuel cell partnership advances clean coal plans".  
  8. ^ "UK developers to build 300 MW hydrogen plant" (PDF). European Power Daily 12 (192) ( 

External links

  • Official website
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