World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Disney Movies Anywhere

Article Id: WHEBN0025190899
Reproduction Date:

Title: Disney Movies Anywhere  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Video on demand
Collection: Digital Rights Management Systems, Disney Technology, Video on Demand
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Disney Movies Anywhere

Keychest is the technology that powers Disney Movies Anywhere, which is a digital movie locker for Disney movies. It allows digital purchases from iTunes, Google Play, and Vudu, and allows streaming of content over the web.

Contents

  • Architecture 1
  • Reception 2
  • Obstacles 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Architecture

Contrasting from UltraViolet, a centrally managed Keychest server allows streaming access to the content. Purchasing content, either online or through physical media, creates a unique key stored in a digital rights locker that unlocks the ability to stream the content to any electronic device capable of playing it. Because the actual content remains on the servers as opposed to being downloaded and played locally, the manufacturers retain control of access to the files. This architecture is now the basis for the Disney Movies Anywhere website and iOS app. The service stores your movies in a digital library that is linked to your Apple iTunes, Google Play, or Vudu accounts, and Disney Movies Rewards accounts, much like the linkage requirement of Ultraviolet.[1][2]

Reception

The technology has been praised for its potential to improve consumer convenience,[3] but has attracted criticism for enabling further use of digital rights management.[4]

Obstacles

There are a number of potential obstacles to implementation. Studios, retailers and service providers will be the ultimate deciding factor when it comes to pricing the extra flexibility KeyChest promises to provide which could ultimately mean higher prices for features that some people may not specifically be interested in. In addition, attracting studios seems to be a challenging endeavour for Disney even though their approach says to be using more open standards than the competing UltraViolet system.[5] Which leaves the biggest obstacle being the competing UltraViolet system as a whole which has the support of all the other major Hollywood movie studios[6] with the only exception being the Walt Disney Studios.

References

  1. ^ http://www.engadget.com/2014/02/25/disney-movies-anywhere/
  2. ^ Mason, JG (October 21, 2009), Future-proof your movie purchases with Disney’s Keychest, retrieved December 4, 2009 
  3. ^ Indiviglio, Daniel (October 21, 2009), Disney's Keychest Technology, retrieved December 3, 2009 
  4. ^ Masnick, Mike (October 23, 2009), Disney's Keychest: Is Giving Back Your Fair Use Rights With More DRM Really A Step Forward?, retrieved December 3, 2009 
  5. ^ Healey, Jon (January 5, 2010), Disney offers KeyChest, but where is the KeyMaster?, retrieved December 8, 2011 
  6. ^ UltraViolet consortium membership http://www.uvvu.com/alliance-members.php

External links

  • Disney Revamps Its Movie Marketing
  • "Disney Touts a Way to Ditch the DVD". The Wall Street Journal. October 21, 2009. 
  • "The Way We'll Watch". The Wall Street Journal. March 1, 2009. 
  • Cliff Edwards (September 15, 2008). "Digital Content Wherever You Want It". 
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.