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Maurice Gee

Maurice Gee (born 22 August 1931[1] in Whakatane, Bay of Plenty Region)[2] is a New Zealand novelist.[3]

Contents

  • Awards and honors 1
  • Early life and career 2
  • Works 3
    • Novels 3.1
    • Short stories: first publication 3.2
  • Adaptations 4
  • See also 5
  • Notes 6
  • References 7
  • External links 8

Awards and honors

Gee was awarded the 1978 James Tait Black Memorial Prize for his novel Plumb. He is an Honorary Associate of the New Zealand Association of Rationalists and Humanists.[4]

In 2002, Gee became the twelfth recipient of the Margaret Mahy Award.[5][6] In 2004, awarded the Prime Minister's Awards for Literary Achievement.[7]

Early life and career

Gee was brought up in Henderson, a suburb of Auckland, a location that frequently features in his writing.[2][3] He completed BA and MA degrees at the University of Auckland, which subsequently recognised him with a Distinguished Alumni Award in 1998, and an honorary Doctor of Literature in 2004.[8] He is married and has three children, one of whom, Emily Gee, is also a writer.[9]

Works

Novels

  • The Big Season. London: Hutchinson, 1962. London: Arrow, 1964. Wellington: Allen & Unwin, 1985.[10]
  • A Special Flower. London: Hutchinson, 1965.
  • In My Father's Den. London: Faber, 1972. Auckland: Oxford UP, 1978.
  • A Glorious Morning, Comrade. Auckland: Auckland UP and Oxford UP, 1975.
  • Games of Choice. London: Faber, 1976. Auckland: Oxford UP, 1978.
  • Plumb. London: Faber, 1978. Auckland: Oxford UP, 1979[10] (Part 1 of the Plumb trilogy).
  • Under the Mountain. Wellington: Oxford UP, 1979.[10]
  • The World Around the Corner. Wellington: Oxford UP, 1980.
  • Meg. London: Faber, 1981. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1982. Auckland: Penguin[10] (Part 2 of the Plumb trilogy).
  • The Halfmen of O. Auckland: Oxford UP, 1982. Harmondsworth: Puffin, 1986.
  • Sole Survivor. London: Faber, 1983. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1983. Auckland: Penguin, 1983[10] (Part 3 of the Plumb trilogy).
  • The Priests of Ferris. Auckland: Oxford UP, 1984.
  • Motherstone. Auckland: Oxford UP, 1985.
  • The Fire-Raiser. Auckland: Puffin, 1986.
  • Collected Stories. Auckland: Penguin, 1986. New York: Penguin, 1987.
  • Prowlers. London and Boston: Faber, 1987.
  • The Champion. Auckland : Puffin, 1989; New York: Simon & Schuster, 1993.
  • The Burning Boy. London : Faber, 1990, 1992; Auckland : Viking, 1990.
  • Going West. Auckland : Viking, 1992; London: Faber, 1992; Auckland: Penguin, 2000.
  • Crime Story.Auckland : Penguin Books, 1994; Auckland: Viking, 1994; London: Faber, 1995.
  • The Fat Man. Auckland : Viking, 1995; Auckland: Puffin, 2000.
  • Plumb Trilogy. Auckland: Penguin, 1995 (Plumb, Meg, & Sole Survivor).
  • Loving Ways. Auckland : Penguin, 1996.
  • Live Bodies. Auckland : Penguin, 1998; London: Faber, 1998; Scheuring: Black Ink, 2002 (German edition).
  • Orchard Street. Auckland : Viking, 1998.
  • Hostel Girl. Auckland : Puffin, 1999.
  • Ellie and the Shadow Man. Auckland: Penguin, 2001.
  • The Scournful Moon. Auckland: Penguin, 2003.
  • Blindsight. Auckland: Penguin, 2005.
  • Salt. Auckland: Puffin, 2007.
  • Gool. Auckland: Puffin, 2008.
  • Access Road. Auckland: Penguin, 2009.
  • The Limping Man. Auckland: Puffin, 2010.

Short stories: first publication

  • In at the Death. Kiwi (1955): 21-26.
  • The Widow. Landfall 9 (1955): 196-213. In GMC, CS.[10]
  • Evening at Home. Arena 45 (1956): 23-24.
  • The Quarry. Arena 46 (1957): 6-10, 13.
  • A Sleeping Face. Landfall 11 (1957): 194-221. In GMC, CS.
  • A Girl in Blue. Mate 2 (1958): 10-19.
  • While the Flag was Up. Arena 50 (1958–59): 13-17, 28.
  • The Losers. Landfall 13 (1959): 120-47. In Landfall Country: Work from Landfall, 1947-1961. Christchurch: Caxton Press, 1962, 24-56. In New Zealand Short Stories, Second Series. Ed. C.K. Stead. London: Oxford UP, 1966, 255-95. In GMC, CS.
  • Facade. Mate. 4 (1960): 26-33.
  • Schooldays. Mate. December 1960: 2-11. In GMC, CS.
  • The Champion. Landfall 20 (1966): 113-25. In GMC, CS.
  • Down in the World. Landfall 21 (1967): 296-302. In GMC, CS.
  • A Retired Life. Landfall 23 (1969): 101-16. In GMC, CS.

Adaptations

Feature films
Television

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Who's who in New Zealand, 12. edition, Auckland 1991, p. 226
  2. ^ a b Maurice Gee bio for Arts Foundation of New Zealand. Retrieved 7 February 2007.
  3. ^ a b Maurice Gee bio for New Zealand Book Council. Retrieved 7 February 2007.
  4. ^ NZARH Honorary Associates, New Zealand Association of Rationalists and Humanists. Retrieved 7 February 2007.2002 Children's Literature Foundation Honour for contribution to children's fiction 2003 Gaylene Gordon Award for Under the Mountain 2004 $60,000 Prime Minister's Awards for Literary Achievement for fiction; Honorary Doctor of Literature - University of Auckland 2006 Deutz Medal for ficton-Montana NZ Book Awards for Blindsight 2008 NZ Post Young Adult Fiction Award for Salt
  5. ^ "Margaret Mahy Medal Award". Christchurch, New Zealand: Christchurch City Libraries. 2012. Retrieved 25 July 2012. 
  6. ^ "Margaret Mahy Award". Storylines.org.nz. Auckland, New Zealand: Storylines Children's Literature Charitable Trust of New Zealand. 2012. Retrieved 25 July 2012. 
  7. ^ "Previous winners".  
  8. ^ "Famous past students - Maurice Gee". University of Auckland. Archived from the original on 15 October 2008. Retrieved 2009-01-07. 
  9. ^ http://www.amazon.com/Emily-Gee/e/B0034PPO7C
  10. ^ a b c d e f Maurice Gee bio listed by the Arts Foundation of New Zealand. Retrieved 23 July 2007

References

  • Giffuni, Cathe. "Maurice Gee: A Bibliography," Australian & New Zealand Studies in Canada, No. 3 Spring 1990.
  • The Oxford Companion to New Zealand Literature, edited by Roger Robinson and Nelson Wattie (1998).

External links

  • More information about Maurice Gee's life and works is available at New Zealand Book Council
  • Academic essay with citations: Dickensian grotesque in Maurice Gee's "The Fat Man"
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