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NetEase

NetEase, Inc.
Native name
网易公司
Public
Traded as NASDAQ: NTES
Industry Internet
Founded June 1997 (1997-06)
Guangzhou, Guangdong, China[1]
Headquarters Guangzhou, Guangdong, China
Key people
William Lei Ding, CEO
Products Online services
Revenue CN¥ 7.290 billion (2011)[2]
CN¥ 4.765 billion (2014)[2]
CN¥ 4.756 billion (2014)[2]
Total assets CN¥ 15.444 billion (2011)[2]
Number of employees
10,004 (2015)[3]
Website .com163

NetEase, Inc. (simplified Chinese: 网易; traditional Chinese: 網易; pinyin: Wǎng Yì) is a leading China-based Internet technology company founded in 1997 that pioneered the development of applications, services and other technologies for the Internet in China. NetEase is China’s largest e-mail service provider and as of June 30, 2015 has 790 million registered e-mail users and over 10,900 employees.

NetEase has 35+ self-developed and licensed mobile games launched, including the No. 1 grossing game on iOS App Store. NetEase provides online game services to Internet users through the in-house development or licensing of massively multi-player online role-playing games, including Fantasy Westward Journey, Westward Journey Online II, Westward Journey Online III, Tianxia III, Heroes of Tang Dynasty, Datang and Ghost, as well as the licensed games, Blizzard Entertainment’s World of Warcraft® and StarCraft® II.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Businesses 2
  • Games 3
    • Licensed Online Games 3.1
  • Expansion 4
  • Music streaming service 5
  • See also 6
  • References 7
  • External links 8

History

The company has grown rapidly since its founding in June 1997, thanks in part to its investment in search engine technology[4] and massively multiplayer online gaming. Fantasy Westward Journey, an MMORPG developed internally by NetEase, is an online game in China.

Ding Lei (Chinese: 丁磊; pinyin: Dīng Lěi; born October 1971), also known as William Ding, is the founder and CEO of NetEase. He made significant contributions to the development of computer networks in mainland China. According to Hurun Report's China Rich List 2013 he is the 25th wealthiest person in China with an estimated fortune of $4.2 billion. He was the wealthiest man in China at one point.[5]

  • 2004: NetEase's founder and chief architect William Ding (Ding Lei) won the Wharton Infosys Business Transformation Award for his innovative use of information technology. Ding became one of the wealthiest individuals in China after founding NetEase.
    Neatease head office in Hangzhou, China
  • 2011-12: NetEase has a market value of US$7.8 billion as of May 2012, and over 6000 employees as of 31 December 2011.[6] As of December 31, 2012, NetEase had 7,098 employees.[3]
  • 2008: The 163.com domain attracted at least 1.8 million visitors annually by 2008 according to a Compete.com survey.[7]
  • 2010: The site was the 28th most visited site in the world according to Alexa's internet rankings[8] and in August 2010, the site was the 27th most visited site drawing more traffic than the websites of AOL, BBC, Flickr, Craigslist, Apple, CNN, LinkedIn, Adobe, CNet, ESPN.
  • 2012: The company's official English name was changed from NetEase.com, Inc to NetEase, Inc.[9] In April 2012, NetEase began testing a restaurant recommendation mobile app called "Fan Fan".[10][11] The company collaborated with coursera.org to provide Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) in China.[12]

Businesses

PC-client & Mobile Games: The leading provider of self-developed online client games to Internet users in China; licensee of leading games by Blizzard Entertainment; developer & publisher of quality mobile games.

Internet Media: Operating a broad and growing network of leading mobile applications, services and popular social communication platforms, as well as Internet portals with enriched content, enabling advertisers to reach one of the largest user bases in China.

E-mail Services: The largest provider of free e-mail services in China, giving great marketing value for advertisers who wish to reach our audience of consumers.

Youdao Products: Specialized online tools including Youdao Dictionary, Youdao Cloudnote and Huihui.cn enrich our Internet media business.

E-commerce: Diverse portfolio of services available to Chinese consumers on both desktop and mobile including Kaola.com, NetEase’s self operated cross-border e-commerce platform, online video broadcasting services and insurance products.[13]

Games[14]

Gamers trying the new release of Speedy Ninja at PAX 2015

Top PC Games: Fantasy Westward Journey II, New Westward Journey Online II, Ghost II, Tianxia III, Revelation, Demon Seals

Mobile Games: mobile Fantasy Westward Journey, Mini Westward Journey, World Soccer Collections, Stay Calm! My Lord!, Dark Blade, Battle to the West, The World HD, Fairy Tales: The World of the Brave

New games planned for launch: Hegemon-King of Western Chu, mobile Westward Journey Online, The X-World and Fantasy Westward Journey: Warriors

Licensed Online Games

  • Commercially launched World of Warcraft ® in Sept 2009
  • StarCraft® II: Heart of the Swarm™ launched in PRC in July 2013
  • Launched free-to-play digital strategy card game Hearthstone® : Heroes of Warcraft™ in PRC in Jan 2014; mobile version launched in April 2015
  • Open beta testing of Heroes of the Storm™ initiated in China in May 2015
  • Initiated open beta testing in PRC of Diablo III®: Reaper of Souls™ in April 2015[14]

Expansion

NetEase launched their first Western Headquarters in August 2014 bringing one of the largest tech companies in China to the US.[15] In 2015, NetEase North America, the San Francisco-based arm of the Chinese technology giant, announced a new funding initiative for independent developers. Known as the NetEase Success Fund, the scheme offers an alternative to traditional publishing by providing up to $500,000 for each accepted developer to fund marketing and advertising. Furthermore, developers awarded funding retain the rights, creative control, and full ownership of their products.

Music streaming service

NetEase has an on-demand music-streaming service; 网易云音乐 (roughly "NetEase cloud music").[16] The service offers streaming from a vast library of music, and does not require first logging in. Since Grooveshark has been shut down, many people have been recommending this service.[17][18]

See also

  • Netease Inc. (company website)
  • NetEase North America

References

  1. ^ "NetEase - Corporation Profile". NetEase.com, Inc. 
  2. ^ a b c d "NetEase Fact sheet FY". Google.com. Retrieved 2012-08-17. 
  3. ^ a b "NetEase Investor FAQs". Netease. 2013-11-28. Retrieved 2013-11-28. 
  4. ^ "Netease Search Engine - Youdao/yodao spider". Httpuseragent.org. 2008-12-31. Retrieved 2012-08-17. 
  5. ^  
  6. ^ "NetEase Fact sheet 1Q12". Phx.corporate-ir.net. Retrieved 2012-08-17. 
  7. ^ us Data Only (2011-10-26). "Siteanalytics.compete.com". Siteanalytics.compete.com. Retrieved 2012-08-17. 
  8. ^ "Alexa Top 500 Global Sites". Retrieved 2010-04-15. 
  9. ^ "NetEase English Name Changes" (in Chinese).  
  10. ^ "Follow news on Netease.com, Inc.". BrightWire. Retrieved 2012-08-17. 
  11. ^ "Netease Begins Testing for Mobile App "Fan Fan" on Thursday.". BrightWire. 
  12. ^ "Coursera partners with NetEase to deliver free online learning in China.". 
  13. ^ "NetEase - Presentation". ir.netease.com. Retrieved 2015-10-16. 
  14. ^ a b "NetEase - Fact Sheet". ir.netease.com. Retrieved 2015-10-16. 
  15. ^ "NetEase North America". www.netease-na.com. Retrieved 2015-10-16. 
  16. ^ "网易云音乐 听见好时光 (NetEase cloud music to listen to the good times)". 网易云音乐 (NetEase cloud music). Retrieved 2015-05-03. 
  17. ^ vonnie (May 3, 2015). "Could NetEase be the next Grooveshark alternative?". fixedbyvonnie. fixedbyvonnie. 
  18. ^ Brinkmann, Martin. "Need a Grooveshark alternative? NetEase Music may be it". www.ghacks.net. ghacks. 

External links

  • 163.com web portal
  • NetEase corporate site
  • NetEase (NTES) (Wikinvest)
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