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Rifleman's Creed

 

Rifleman's Creed

The Rifleman's Creed (also known as My Rifle and The Creed of the United States Marine) is a part of basic United States Marine Corps doctrine. Major General William H. Rupertus wrote it during World War II, probably in late 1941 or early 1942. All enlisted Marines learn the creed at recruit training. Different, more concise versions of the creed have developed since its early days, but those closest to the original version remain the most widely accepted.[1][2]

Original text

Rifleman's Creed[1]
This is my rifle. There are many like it, but this one is mine.
My rifle is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it as I must master my life.
My rifle, without me, is useless. Without my rifle, I am useless. I must fire my rifle true. I must shoot straighter than my enemy who is trying to kill me. I must shoot him before he shoots me. I will...
My rifle and I know that what counts in war is not the rounds we fire, the noise of our burst, nor the smoke we make. We know that it is the hits that count. We will hit...
My rifle is human, even as I, because it is my life. Thus, I will learn it as a brother. I will learn its weaknesses, its strength, its parts, its accessories, its sights and its barrel. I will keep my rifle clean and ready, even as I am clean and ready. We will become part of each other. We will...
Before God, I swear this creed. My rifle and I are the defenders of my country. We are the masters of our enemy. We are the saviors of my life.
So be it, until victory is America's and there is no enemy, but peace!

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Major General William H. Rupertus. "My Rifle: The Creed of a U.S. Marine". United States Marine Corps. Archived from the original on 2007-03-10. 
  2. ^ Major General William H. Rupertus. "My Rifle: The Creed of a U.S. Marine". U.S. Military. About.com. 
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