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San Nazaro in Brolo

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San Nazaro in Brolo

San Nazaro in Brolo
Façade with the Trivulzio Mausoleum.
Basic information
Location Milan
Geographic coordinates
Affiliation Roman Catholic
Ecclesiastical or organizational status Basilica
Status Active
Architectural description
Architectural type Basilica
Architectural style Romanesque
Groundbreaking 382
View of the interior of the church

The basilica of San Nazaro in Brolo or San Nazaro Maggiore is a church in Milan, northern Italy.

History

The church was built by St. Ambrose starting from 382 on the road that connected Milan (then Mediolanum) to Rome. It was originally dedicated to the Apostles, and thus known as Basilica Apostolorum.

Overview

As explained by an inscription in the church written by Ambrose himself, the church's plan was on the Greek Cross with apses on the arms, a feature present only in the Church of the Holy Apostles in Constantinople. In front of the basilica was a porticoed atrium. Under the basilica's altar were housed the relics of the Apostles, which are still present. In 397, when the body of St. Nazarus was discovered, a new apse was created. Serena, niece of emperor Theodosius I, donated the marbles for the sacellum housing the relics and also embellished the rest of the church.

The apse of the right arm has a portal with a false porch. The ceiling of the nave, originally consisting of wooden spans, was replaced by a groin vault during the Middle Ages. The walls are original. Also in this age the Romanesque-style octagonal tambour, featuring a circular loggia with small columns, was added over the arms' crossing.

Starting from 1512, Bramantino built the Trivulzio Mausoleum, which obstructs the Palaeo-Christian façade.

Gallery

Further reading

External links

  • Page about medieval art (Italian)


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