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Solitaire

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Title: Solitaire  
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Subject: Game classification, Traditional game, Solitaire (disambiguation), Player (game), Baker's Game, Simple Simon (solitaire), PDAmill, Orange E200, Nertz, Ultimate Card Games
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Solitaire

For other uses, see Solitaire (disambiguation).


Solitaire is any tabletop game which one can play by oneself. In the US, it refers to a card game played by oneself; In the UK the term Patience refers to solitaire with cards. The term "solitaire" is also used for single-player games of concentration and skill using a set layout of tiles, pegs or stones rather than cards. These games include Peg solitaire and Mahjong solitaire. Most solitaire games function as a puzzle which, due to a different starting position, may (or may not) be solved in a different fashion each time.

The first collection of solitaire card games in the English language is attributed to Lady Adelaide Cadogan through her Illustrated Games of Patience, published in about 1870 and reprinted several times.

Types of games

  • Patience, also known as "solitaire with cards", generally involves placing cards in a layout, and sorting them according to specific rules. A common variant is Klondike, which is included with the Windows operating system under the title Solitaire.
  • Mahjong solitaire
  • Peg solitaire (more of a puzzle than a game, since, once it is solved, it is repeatable)
  • Concentration also known as Memory, Pelmanism, Shinkei-suijaku, Pexeso or simply Pairs, a card game in which all of the cards are laid face down on a surface and two cards are flipped face up over each turn. The object of the game is to turn over pairs of matching cards.

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