World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Webmaster

Article Id: WHEBN0000294834
Reproduction Date:

Title: Webmaster  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Jon Hein, Melissa Anelli, Online producer, Chief web officer, Anchor text
Collection: Computer Occupations, Website Management
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Webmaster

A webmaster (from web and master),[1] also called a web architect, web developer, site author, website administrator, or website coordinator is a person responsible for maintaining one or many websites. The duties of the webmaster may include: ensuring that the web servers, hardware and software are operating correctly, designing the website, generating and revising web pages, A/B testing, replying to user comments, and examining traffic through the site. As a general rule, professional webmasters "must also be well-versed in Web transaction software, payment-processing software, and security software."[2] Due to the RFC 822 requirement for establishing a "postmaster" email address for the single point of contact for the email administrator of a domain, the "webmaster" address and title were unofficially adopted by analogy for the website administrator. Webmasters may be generalists with HTML expertise who manage most or all aspects of Web operations. Depending on the nature of the websites they manage, webmasters typically know scripting languages such as JavaScript, ColdFusion, .NET, PHP and Perl. They may also be required to know how to configure web servers such as Apache HTTP Server (Apache) or Internet Information Services (IIS) and be a server administrator. Most server roles would however be overseen by the IT Administrator. Core responsibilities of the webmaster may include the regulation and management of access rights of different users of a website or content management system, the appearance and setting up website navigation. Content placement can be part of a webmaster's numerous duties, though content creation may not be.

See also

References

  1. ^ "webmaster, n.". Oxford English Dictionary (draft entry ed.). Oxford University Press. December 2008. 
  2. ^ Oz, Effy (2008), Management Information Systems, Cengage Learning, p. 29,  
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.