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Xlibris

Xlibris
Parent company Author Solutions
Founded 1997
Country of origin United States
Key people Andrew Phillips CEO
Publication types Books
Official website .com.xlibriswww

Xlibris is a self-publishing[1] and on-demand printing services provider, founded in 1997 and based in Bloomington, Indiana.[2] In 2000, The New York Times stated it to be the foremost on-demand publisher.[3] The current chief executive is Andrew Philips, who was formerly the president of Penguin International.[4]

Contents

  • Overview 1
  • Reception 2
  • Status as a vanity press 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Overview

Xlibris is a printing and distribution service that produces hardback and paperback books.[3] It also publishes e-books in several formats. The company was acquired by the self-publishing company Author Solutions, Inc., on January 8, 2009.[5] Prior to that, 49% of the company had been owned by Random House.[3][6]

It is "nonselective" in accepting manuscripts,[1] describes itself as a publishing services provider rather than a publisher, and considers a book's author its publisher.[2] Beginning in 2000, the company expanded its operations globally, opening full-service offices in Europe and Japan.[4]

In 2008, Xlibris was stated to have 20,000 titles in print, by more than 18,000 authors.[1]

The name is a derivation of the Latin term ex libris, which means "from the library of".[2]

Reception

In a

  • Company website

External links

  1. ^ a b c Rachel Donadio: You’re an Author? Me Too! The New York Times, April 27, 2008
  2. ^ a b c "FAQ: About Xlibris". Xlibris.com. Retrieved 2008-04-08. 
  3. ^ a b c d D. T. Max (July 16, 2000). "No More Rejections".  
  4. ^ a b Maryann Yin (May 3, 2013). "Andrew Phillips Named Next Author Solutions CEO".  
  5. ^ Trachtenberg, Jeffrey A. (2009-01-08). "Print-on-Demand Publishers Marry As Author Solutions Buys Xlibris". The Wall Street Journal. 
  6. ^ Gayle Feldman (March 1, 2004). "Got a Book in You? More Companies Than Ever Are Willing to Get It Out".  
  7. ^ a b Carol Alabaster (2002). Developing an outstanding core collection: a guide for libraries. ALA Editions.  
  8. ^ vanity press - Definition from the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary
  9. ^ Self Publishing Your Book
  10. ^ Ask Ron

References

The Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary defines a vanity press as "a publishing house that publishes books at the author's expense".[8] While Xlibris does charge fees up front for authors, it claims not to be a vanity press, on the grounds that ownership of the book remains with the author and that it does not force the author to buy copies of the book. On the other side of the debate, it charges up-front fees without a guarantee of sales and its rates have been reported to be higher than those of competitors.[9][10]

Status as a vanity press

Roland LaPlante, writing in Harper's Magazine, noted in 2001 that Xlibris's predicted future output of 100,000 titles a year would equal the number of all books published in the United States in 1999, and worried these "mostly dubious" works would "affect American publishing in every worst way and obliterate what remains of a genuine book culture."[7] The company countered that "everyone has a story to tell" and its output preserved the "richness of humanity".[7]

[3]

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